Oasis Online Reflective Writing Group – June 9th 🗓

Oasis Online Reflective Writing Group – Next date June 9th, 7-830 pm EST

Invitation for The Oasis, a Medical Humanities Writing Group :

This initiative is open to all learners in the health sciences and related disciplines (i.e. medical students, nursing students, residents etc.). This writing group provides a supportive space for learners to gather, reflect, and engage with peers during these unprecedented times.

The group will meet via Zoom on a bimonthly basis for a narrative medicine-based workshop co-facilitated by two psychiatry residents at the University of  Toronto , Phoebe Bao and Nikhita Singhal.

Sample Prompt: “Write about a stranger that has stayed in your mind after the encounter”  Writing prompts will be provided in session; no writing experience or preparation necessary.

For questions, suggestions, or to learn more, please contact Phoebe (phoebe.bao@mail.utoronto.ca) and Nikhita ( n.singhal@mail.utoronto.ca). RSVP here https://forms.gle/H2bo9cRf7X9SEtRV9 by June 8th to express your interest in this or future meetings, and to receive the Zoom invitation.

Our next meeting is June 9th from 7-8:30pm.

The World is Bright – Hot Docs Ontario screening time 🗓

Please spread the word about the screening of this film directed by Ying Wang , which  film won the Emerging Canadian Filmmaker Award at Hot Docs :

https://www.hotdocs.ca/news/hd20-award-winners

The film tackles issues of mental health, isolation and immigration, and is even more relevant now when mental health problems have become a world crisis due to the COVID 19 pandemic.

For the Ontario Premiere, go to :  

https://boxoffice.hotdocs.ca/websales/pages/info.aspx?evtinfo=125201~741853d5-bf72-40a5-a015-09aded779383&ep=1

The tickets are on sale now and people can watch the film BETWEEN May 28 until June 26 at    https://www.hotdocs.ca/.

Some Spaces available for the last Online Poetry Crash Cart tomorrow 🗓

Poetry Crash Cart: Loving and Working During Covid-19 for Health Care Students and Workers 

This is the last of an online, weekly hour and a half of poetry workshop for health care students and clinical workers. For people working in acute and ongoing moments of need. For all of us now. What might poetry do here?

Poet Ronna Bloom will introduce poetry that has been used in hospitals, and is being shared widely now online, and will read poems that speak to different moments and needs. The aim is to offer the perhaps tired student and practitioner a listening experience, a conversation about poetry, and a chance to write.

Each session will focus on poems and prompts for writing aimed at bringing us more fully into awareness with spontaneity and self-care. No writing experience necessary.

One more session TOMORROW, a few added spaces ——> Wednesday May 20th  4-5:30PM

Register at Eventbrite for details and a Zoom link. There is no fee to participate.

Ronna Bloom is the author of six books of poetry. Her most recent book, The More, was published by Pedlar Press in 2017 and long listed for the City of Toronto Book Award. Her poems have been recorded by the CNIB and translated into Spanish, Bangla, and Chinese.

Ronna developed the first Poet in Residence program at Sinai Health which ran from 2012-2019. She is currently Poet in Community to the University of Toronto and Poet in Residence in the Health, Arts and Humanities Programme. Her “Spontaneous Poetry Booth” and “RX for Poetry” have been featured in hospitals, fundraisers and local fairs in Canada and abroad. She runs workshops and gives talks on poetry, spontaneity, and awareness through writing. ronnabloom.com

Workshop Conditions : 

By requesting to join this ZOOM writing workshop, you confirm that you are a health professional, clinician or health professions student. Any personal narratives shared must respect patient confidentiality and their right to complete privacy. If verbally sharing a piece of writing about a clinical encounter during the workshop, you must change a patient’s name and omit /alter any other unique or identifying characteristics. Sessions must not be audio or video-recorded.

Online conduct university guidelines can be found at:

https://utmedhumanities.wordpress.com/blog-moderation-guidelines/

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS FOR CANADIAN COVID-19 ANTHOLOGY

The Covid Journals: Dispatches From The Front Lines

Edited by Damian Tarnopolsky PhD and Shane Neilson MD, with a foreword by Allan Peterkin MD.

The coronavirus pandemic presents an unprecedented challenge on all levels of Canadian society. Essential workers on the so-called “front lines” are routinely cited as heroes in newsprint and online, on television broadcasts, and coffee shop signs because they risk developing a severe infection in the course of their daily work. But what is the cost of heroism, and what is it really like to work for the health care workers themselves? What has the actual experience been for doctors, nurses, EMS/ambulance professionals, respiratory technicians, dieticians, spiritual care workers   and others in Canada? Has COVID taught us new lessons about self-care and caring for others? How have issues of power and privilege affected your own work and relationships with colleagues, patients and clients during this time?

TELL YOUR OWN STORY:

We wish to learn of COVID stories of all kinds from all over the country to see whether creative and reflective writing by health professionals can help society see the pandemic differently.

The editors seek previously unpublished fiction, micro-fiction/flash, creative non-fiction, memoir, essay, poetry, comics/graphic medicine panels, photography, art, etc. for a collection tentatively scheduled for publication in fall 2021. We welcome contributions from practitioners in ANY health discipline, and particularly from historically and currently under-presented voices. We seek writing from residents of Canada or pieces that focus on the Canadian experience in particular.

Creative and reflective responses to any aspect of the pandemic are invited, from the experience of “front line” work, the nature of virtual appointments, the balance of home and work in the pandemic context, the role of story in the patient experience, narrative -based discussions of ethical questions raised by Coronavirus care, thoughts and hopes for what comes next. We are interested in work that communicates the practitioner’s lived experience with COVID-19 , and takes this opportunity to shape and understand the narrative of pandemic as it happens .

Authors must maintain the confidentiality of patients (if clinical encounters are discussed), also of colleagues and staff. Any creative work inspired by clinical experiences should be free of specific identifiers (e.g. particular places, dates, unique or identifying features, real names of practitioners and patients.)

Please direct previously unpublished submissions (maximum 3000 words or 5 pages poetry/graphics) with a 100-word biographical note   by August 30th 2020   to :

covidjournals1@gmail.com

For more information , including contractual details, please contact the editors at : covidjournals1@gmail.com


About the Editors:

Damian Tarnopolsky PhD teaches creative and reflective writing and narrative medicine in the Health, Arts and Humanities Program at the University of Toronto. An acclaimed writer in many genres, his fiction has been nominated for the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Journey Prize, and his play The Defence won the 2019 Voaden Prize. His essays and articles have appeared in The WalrusReader’s Digest, Partisan Magazine, and elsewhere, and he recently served as a juror for the Toronto Book Awards. He runs Slingsby and Dixon, an editing company.

Shane Neilson is a disabled poet, physician, and critic who lives in Oakville, Ontario. He completed his PhD in English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University in 2018. His book, Dysphoria (PQL, 2017) was awarded the Hamilton Literary Award for Poetry in 2018. He is currently completing a postdoctoral position at McMaster supported by a $50,000 ‘Talent” grant awarded by SSHRC in 2018. Other good things to happen to Shane include receiving the Governor General’s Gold Medal for his dissertation work in disability studies and the Regional Dean’s Award for Excellence in Medical Education which was also bestowed for Shane’s championing of disability in McMaster’s medical faculty. He is the festival director of the AbleHamilton Poetry Festival which just successfully completed its second run. Finally, he is also the Poetry Advisor for the Canadian Medical Association Journal where he actively works to include poems by disabled writers. His poems appeared in Poetry Magazine in April of this year. Work from his latest book, New Brunswick, has appeared on Verse Daily.

Allan Peterkin MD is a Professor of Psychiatry and Family Medicine at the University of Toronto, where he heads The Program In Health, Arts and Humanities (www.health-humanities.com). He is the author/editor  of 14 books on  medical humanities, narrative medicine, physician health, cultural history  and human sexuality. Over 20 years, Dr Peterkin co-led a therapeutic writing group for men and women living with HIV, with occupational therapist, Julie Hann.  This work resulted in an acclaimed collection of patient narratives called ” STILL HERE-A POST-COCKTAIL AIDS ANTHOLOGY.”

Three online poetry sessions for healthcare workers and students – OK to drop in 🗓

Message from RONNA BLOOM-Poet In Residence For the Program In Health, Arts and Humanities:

Dear friends,

I write this note to you, wishing you well where you are, and with two things to share.

As Italy begins to step outside, I offer a new piece of writing, Venice Journals, published online this week by Ice Floe Press. It’s an excerpt of a manuscript in progress with poems and photographs from many visits. Sent with love for that wondrous city. May they/we emerge in health.

Starting today, I am doing a series of 3 poetry sessions:  The Poetry Crash Cart — Loving and Working During Covid-19 — for Health Care Workers and Students. This is a low pressure event — meant to be a rest — with poetry. I will introduce poetry that has been used in hospitals, and is being shared now widely online and will read poems that speak to different moments and needs. Then we’ll write. There are a few spots left. If you’re interested in joining something like this and you’re not in health care, please let me know.

Sending energy out in your direction.

Ronna

Venice Journals: poems and photographs

One tiny poem written as the pandemic began, “Dear Heart.” For anyone who needs it. xo

The Oasis, an Online Medical Humanities Writing Group for U of T Residents and Fellows 🗓

Begins May 7, 2020

Introducing The Oasis, an Online Medical Humanities Writing Group for University of Toronto Residents and Fellows: 

This initiative, open to all GTA residents and fellows, aims to provide a safe and supportive space for learners to gather, reflect, and engage with peers during these challenging and unprecedented times. The group will meet via Zoom on a biweekly basis for a narrative medicine-based workshop co-facilitated by two psychiatry residents, Phoebe Bao and Nikhita Singhal. Writing prompts will be provided during the sessions; no prior experience or preparation required. Here’s a sample prompt: “If you could travel through time, write a dialogue between your current self and your one-month-ago self, about the future to come.”
For questions, suggestions, or to learn more, please contact Phoebe (phoebe.bao@mail.utoronto.ca) and Nikhita ( n.singhal@mail.utoronto.ca).
We encourage you to RSVP here https://forms.gle/H2bo9cRf7X9SEtRV9 , however drop in attendance is also welcome!
The first meeting shall take place on May 7th from 7-8:30pm.
Meeting ID: 960 8068 7551

Poetry Crash Cart: Loving and Working During Covid-19 🗓

Poetry Crash Cart: Loving and Working During Covid-19

for Health Care Students and Workers 

This is a weekly hour and a half of poetry for health care students and clinical workers. For people working in acute and ongoing moments of need. For all of us now. What might poetry do here?

Poet Ronna Bloom will introduce poetry that has been used in hospitals, and is being shared widely now online, and will read poems that speak to different moments and needs. The aim is to offer the perhaps tired student and practitioner a listening experience, a conversation about poetry, and a chance to write.

Each of the 4 sessions will focus on poems and prompts for writing aimed at bringing us more fully into awareness with spontaneity and self-care. No writing experience necessary.

Wednesdays May 6, 13, 20, 27.  4PM-5:30

You can drop in for any or all of the 4 sessions and don’t have to sign up for all sessions. Register by noon of the day you’d like to come at Eventbrite for details and a Zoom link. There is no fee to participate.

Ronna Bloom is the author of six books of poetry. Her most recent book, The More, was published by Pedlar Press in 2017 and long listed for the City of Toronto Book Award. Her poems have been recorded by the CNIB and translated into Spanish, Bangla, and Chinese.

Ronna developed the first Poet in Residence program at Sinai Health which ran from 2012-2019. She is currently Poet in Community to the University of Toronto and Poet in Residence in the Health, Arts and Humanities Programme. Her “Spontaneous Poetry Booth” and “RX for Poetry” have been featured in hospitals, fundraisers and local fairs in Canada and abroad. She runs workshops and gives talks on poetry, spontaneity, and awareness through writing. ronnabloom.com

Workshop Conditions :

By requesting to join this ZOOM writing workshop, you confirm that you are a University of Toronto-affiliated health professional, clinician or health professions student. Any personal narratives shared must respect patient confidentiality and their right to complete privacy. If verbally sharing a piece of writing about a clinical encounter during the workshop, you must change a patient’s name and omit /alter any other unique or identifying characteristics. Sessions must not be audio or video-recorded.

Online conduct university guidelines can be found at:

https://utmedhumanities.wordpress.com/blog-moderation-guidelines/

COVID-19 Bio-Ethics Resources

PLEASE SEE BIO-ETHICS RESOURCES PREPARED BY UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MEDICAL STUDENTS JANE ZHU, ALEX FLORESCU AND TEAM.

Many thanks to them for this terrific initiative and to all of you who shared resources, curricula  and content.

This collaborative document is a work-in-progress, created by students to stimulate reflection and discussion during a time of great ambiguity and challenging decisions. Sources provided do not necessarily represent the views of The University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine. We invite readers to share new resources and to reflect thoughtfully and critically on those provided here.

Jane and Alex are happy to present  their final working copy: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1gsFoFhZ9JqUYLqi2dIAKeWZU3VrM4Y0l2pzMPoOIA28/edit?usp=sharing  as well as a one-page “At a Glance” summary sheet released (see PDF), which contains a quick summary of  documents and select references.

Allan Peterkin MD

WWW.HEALTH-HUMANITIES.COM

Call For Submissions for Graphic Truths Anthology of Medical Comics

Graphic Truths: The Making (and Unmaking) of a Doctor 

An anthology of comics, edited by Shelley L. Wall, PhD, Josh Feder, MD, Jillian Horton, MD, and Allan Peterkin, MD.

This is a renewed call for submissions, in light of the current COVID-19 pandemic.

Are you in pre-med studiesmedical school, or medical residency anywhere in the world?

Are you a medical doctor with vivid recollections of your past medical training, or reflections on your current practice?

Have you witnessed the medical training process as a family member or as another healthcare professional?

We are seeking comics about your current and/or past experiences for an anthology.

The arts provide a powerful means to represent the intense and complex process of becoming a doctor. The medium of comics, with its combination of image and text and its rich vocabulary of narrative conventions, offers a fresh means to convey the nuances of communication within the clinical context. Until now, no anthology of comics has captured the experience of medical trainees across the arc of their journey, from applicant to fully-fledged physician.

The volume we are proposing, tentatively entitled Graphic Truths: The Making (and Unmaking) of a Doctor, will reflect the breadth, as well as the heights and depths, of medical training across countries and across specialties. This anthology will provide a channel for medical trainees and those close to them to share their stories, and give the wider public a meaningful and accessible glimpse “behind the scenes” of medical training and practice.

No art experience necessary! 

Images can be simple. What we’re interested in are your stories, told with image and text. Submissions can be single panels, or stories told in a sequence of panels.

New Deadline: July 31,2020

For more information, including suggested themes, technical specifications, and submissions instructions, please visit www.graphic-truths.com.

COVID AND THE ARTS/HUMANITIES-PART TWO

Short Pieces for Long Days:

A SARS-Cov-2 Medical Humanities Reader

Articles, essays and art

Curated by:  David Elkin, MD, MSL from UCSF

davidelkin@comcast.net

(Selections do not represent the views of SFGH or UCSF)

Historical Perspectives

Bugs and people: when epidemics change history:

https://hekint.org/2018/03/15/bugs-people-epidemics-change-history/?highlight=epidemic

Samuel Pepys, Plague of 1665:

 https://www.laphamsquarterly.org/roundtable/viral-news

Plague cure link to contemporary drink:

The 1700s Plague Cure That Inspired an Uncannily Contemporary Cocktail

Cholera epidemic in London, Steven Johnson telling the story of John Snow. Ghost Map: How the “ghost map” helped end a killer disease

Semmelweis and the power of hand-washing:

https://theconversation.com/ignaz-semmelweis-the-doctor-who-discovered-the-disease-fighting-power-of-hand-washing-in-1847-135528?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20April%2014%202020%20-%201593215257&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20April%2014%202020%20-%201593215257+Version+A+CID_e3bdee1a91f54bfced32288468a1a18c&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=Ignaz%20Semmelweis%20the%20doctor%20who%20discovered%20the%20disease-fighting%20power%20of%20hand-washing%20in%201847

Origins of the term “quarantine,” Mary Mallon (“Typhoid Mary”) (Science Diction podcast):

https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/science-diction/articles/science-diction-quarantine?utm_source=Science+Diction&utm_campaign=f669ee4b05-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2020_03_09_05_58_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_802987ac5b-f669ee4b05-54764673

Short film: 1918 influenza epidemic (Cambridge University):
Spanish Flu: a warning from history

Impacts of 1918 Pandemic on Public Health, Healthcare System Organization, Health Policies: How the 1918 Flu Pandemic Revolutionized Public Health | History

The 1918 flu pandemic and WWI: Competing memories:

Katherine Anne Porter and the 1918 Influenza Epidemic

Historical perspectives on viral vaccine development (including comparisons of influenza, zika, ebola, etc) How to Stop a Lethal Virus | Science

What Can Images of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic Teach Us About COVID-19?

Images from the National Archives Catalog show striking parallels to today’s crisis, from masks to emergency hospitals.

https://hyperallergic.com/552295/1918-influenza-pandemic-covid-19/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=D040820&utm_content=D040820+CID_770d615555bdab36172560f7bad8ec8e&utm_source=HyperallergicNewsletter&utm_term=What%20Can%20Images%20of%20the%201918%20Influenza%20Pandemic%20Teach%20Us%20About%20COVID-19

Mary Mallon (“Typhoid Mary”) revisited

Awful Moments In Quarantine History: Remember Typhoid Mary?

How Infectious Disease Defined the American Bathroom:

The War Against Coronavirus Comes to the Bathroom

HIV, SARS-CoV-2 and San Francisco: Two epidemics: https://www.sfchronicle.com/health/article/How-San-Francisco-s-battle-with-HIV-AIDS-shaped-15179365.php?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=headlines&utm_campaign=sfc_morningfix&sid=53bb17669dbcd4560200028a

First deaths from Covid-19 in the US:

The first 1,000: Who the U.S.’s first victims were and what we’ve learned

Challenges facing journalists as they recognize they are writing a rough draft of history:

https://theconversation.com/journalists-are-recognizing-theyre-writing-a-rough-draft-of-history-and-cant-say-definitively-thats-the-way-it-is-135875?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20April%2014%202020%20-%201593215257&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20April%2014%202020%20-%201593215257+Version+A+CID_e3bdee1a91f54bfced32288468a1a18c&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=Writing%20the%20rough%20draft%20of%20coronavirus%20history

Literature 

NYReview of Books Pandemic journal: https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2020/04/06/pandemic-journal-april-6-12/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Publishers%20Letter%2047&utm_content=Publishers%20Letter%2047+CID_2a3692d1ede5dc3ac9a912033cf5d6ee&utm_source=Newsletter&utm_term=Pandemic%20Journal

The role of the humanities (Netscape: “Yes, There Is a Role for Poetry and Fiction in a Pandemic” Robert Harrington and Abraham Verghese): https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/927624#vp_1

Writers (Atwood and St. John) who described pandemics in fiction:

Culture – The plague writers who predicted today

The Exquisite Pain of Reading in Quarantine:

Quarantine Book Clubs Reminded Me to Read

Poetry

Isolation and Stress

Isolation and stress: How will humans, by nature social animals, fare when isolated?

Psychology: An astronaut’s guide to surviving isolation

An astronaut’s guide to surviving isolation

Psychology: Astronaut, antarctic explorers and climbers on isolation

Living an isolated life: Astronauts, Antarctic doctors and climbers share their advice

This American Life Podcast, Episode 698, The Test: Act 1: The Inside Game The Test

“Welcome to Seclusion” by Sergio Benvenuto Published in Italian on Antinomie:

https://antinomie.it/index.php/2020/03/05/benvenuto-in-clausura/)

Navigating relationships in isolation:

How to maintain relationships in self-isolation

Social Issues/Impact

Psychological tips for maintaining social relationships during lockdown:

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2240487-psychology-tips-for-maintaining-social-relationships-during-lockdown/?utm_source=NSDAY&utm_campaign=adbf6d03c7-NSDAY_150420&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_1254aaab7a-adbf6d03c7-373962775#

Hidden suffering of coronavirus: Stigma, blaming, shaming:

 Hidden suffering of coronavirus: Stigma, blaming, shaming

The Dangerous History of Immunoprivilege

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/12/opinion/coronavirus-immunity-passports.html?algo=identity&fellback=false&imp_id=988197462&action=click&module=moreIn&pgtype=Article&region=Footer

Fear among the disabled:

People With Disabilities Worry They Won’t Get Treatment

Changing conceptions of disability and the pandemic:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/peterslatin/2020/04/07/pandemic-is-a-disability-for-all/#6e7dd73c240d

Evolving social mores: what to do when someone violates social distancing:

Standing Too Close. Not Covering Coughs. If Someone Is Violating Social Distancing Rules, What Do You Do?

German zoo may have to feed animals to each otherHow do morgues and pathologists handle the surge in dead bodies:

https://theconversation.com/overloaded-morgues-mass-graves-and-infectious-remains-how-forensic-pathologists-handle-the-coronavirus-dead-135275?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Weekly%20science%20and%20research%20newsletter%2041520&utm_content=Weekly%20science%20and%20research%20newsletter%2041520+CID_0630bc5dcded75675053bced5ffe6a76&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=Overloaded%20morgues%20mass%20graves%20and%20infectious%20remains%20How%20forensic%20pathologists%20handle%20the%20coronavirus%20dead

Health Care Inequity in COVID-19 infection and mortality

Higher death rate from Covid-19 in African Americans:

 ‘It’s a racial justice issue’: Black Americans are dying in greater numbers from Covid-19

and The Pandemic Will Cleave America in Two

Social inequity and the COVID-19 epidemic in the U.S.:

https://slate.com/technology/2020/04/coronavirus-covid19-black-americans-impact.html

and

‘It’s a racial justice issue’: Black Americans are dying in greater numbers from Covid-19

and

Racial Bias Showing Up In Coronavirus Testing And Treatment : Shots – Health News

and

https://theconversation.com/covid-19-is-hitting-black-and-poor-communities-the-hardest-underscoring-fault-lines-in-access-and-care-for-those-on-margins-135615?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20April%209%202020%20-%201589015218&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20April%209%202020%20-%201589015218+Version+A+CID_38b90393eca1eaec6b97525ff22c2a30&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=COVID-19%20is%20hitting%20black%20and%20poor%20communities%20the%20hardest%20underscoring%20fault%20lines%20in%20access%20and%20care%20for%20those%20on%20margins

and:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/lisafitzpatrick/2020/04/08/coronavirus-has-exposed-the-world-to-health-disparities-in-black-america-so-what-now/#63c15b3621ca

Racism, poverty and the high incidence of Covid-19 in Detroit:

How racism and poverty made Detroit a new coronavirus hot spot

Covid-19 and the state of health care in the US:

Coronavirus is revealing how broken America’s economy really is

Pollution drops during lockdown:

‘It’s positively alpine!’: Disbelief in big cities as air pollution falls

The Geography of Coronavirus:

What We Know About Density and Covid-19’s Spread

A lot of people don’t know they should stay home:

https://www.wired.com/story/a-lot-of-people-dont-even-know-they-should-stay-home/?bxid=5c5b21f92ddf9c2e3579c781&cndid=17027253&esrc=AUTO_PRINT&source=EDT_WIR_NEWSLETTER_0_DAILY_ZZ&utm_brand=wired&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_mailing=WIR_Daily_041220&utm_medium=email&utm_source=nl&utm_term=list2_p2

Technology will save us. Or will it?

Analysis | The Technology 202: There are a lot of questions about Google and Apple’s big coronavirus effort

When will the economy turn around? The coronavirus recession, explained.

Privacy and surveillance:

https://theconversation.com/digital-surveillance-can-help-bring-the-coronavirus-pandemic-under-control-but-also-threatens-privacy-135151?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Weekly%20science%20and%20research%20newsletter%2041520&utm_content=Weekly%20science%20and%20research%20newsletter%2041520+CID_0630bc5dcded75675053bced5ffe6a76&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=Digital%20surveillance%20can%20help%20bring%20the%20coronavirus%20pandemic%20under%20control%20%20but%20also%20threatens%20privacy

Mental Health Impact

Lockdowns, stress and domestic violence:

Global Lockdowns Resulting In ‘Horrifying Surge’ In Domestic Violence, U.N. Warns

Pandemics and serious mental illness:

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/2764227?utm_campaign=articlePDF%26utm_medium%3darticlePDFlink%26utm_source%3darticlePDF%26utm_content%3djamapsychiatry.2020.0894

The Arts

Picturing Disease:

Little Demons, Death And Biting Dogs: How We Picture Disease

Photography and the epidemic:

20 photographs of the week | Art and design

How do you make the case for art and artists during the pandemic?

In a Pandemic, How Do You Make the Case for an Art Emergency?

Covid-19: Street artists take on the pandemic:

Street Artists Take On Coronavirus Pandemic With Powerful, Poignant And Witty Pieces

More work from street artists:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2020/apr/06/coronavirus-street-art-in-pictures?utm_term=RWRpdG9yaWFsX0FydFdlZWtseS0yMDA0MTA%3D&utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=ArtWeekly&CMP=artweekly_email

New Yorker cover: “After the shift”

Owen Smith’s “After the Shift”

Video: Ohio PSA about the effects of social distancing and flattening the curve:

https://digg.com/video/a-brilliantly-simple-psa-about-social-distancing-from-the-state-of-ohio

And how they filmed it:

Mousetrap PSA Nails Importance Of Social Distancing In The Snappiest Way

Art from past pandemics:

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/t-magazine/art-coronavirus.html

Plague in art:

Plague in Art: 10 Paintings You Should Know in the Times of Coronavirus

Art re-enactments at home:

Instagram challenge sparks hilarious submission of painting reenactments

And:     https://www.sadanduseless.com/recreated-art/

And:   People are Recreating Classic Paintings as Hilarious Photos in Quarantine

Ending lockdown in Wuhan (photos):

https://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2020/apr/08/wuhan-ends-coronavirus-lockdown-in-pictures?utm_term=RWRpdG9yaWFsX0Nvcm9uYXZpcnVzVGhlV2Vla0V4cGxhaW5lZC0yMDA0MTA%3D&utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=CoronavirusTheWeekExplained&CMP=coronavirusweek_email

Lessons from Ebola: Health care providers pin photos of their face to their gown to connect with their patients:

A Photo Project Helps Mitigate Patient Loneliness During COVID-19 Pandemic

Children’s books, re-imagined:

‘Gruffalo stayed in the cave’: Axel Scheffler and Julia Donaldson’s coronavirus cartoons

Why the Covid-19 epidemic is so hard to model, explained in comics:

A Comic Strip Tour Of The Wild World Of Pandemic Modeling

Politics and Public Health

2017 piece wondering if America was ready for a pandemic:

Is America Ready for a Global Pandemic?

And it turns out we weren’t–a public health lesson for future generations:

Trump ignored coronavirus warnings from experts for months

More on the public health failure to contain SARS-CoV-2 during early 2020:

He Could Have Seen What Was Coming: Behind Trump’s Failure on the Virus

The role of political leadership:

https://theconversation.com/three-reasons-why-jacinda-arderns-coronavirus-response-has-been-a-masterclass-in-crisis-leadership-135541?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20April%2014%202020%20-%201593215257&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20April%2014%202020%20-%201593215257+Version+A+CID_e3bdee1a91f54bfced32288468a1a18c&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=Three%20reasons%20why%20Jacinda%20Arderns%20coronavirus%20response%20has%20been%20a%20masterclass%20in%20crisis%20leadership

Reflections

New York Review of Books Pandemic Journal: Pandemic Journal, March 23–29

Leslie Jamison on single parenting during the pandemic: ‘Since I Became Symptomatic’

Breaking up in a pandemic:

Getting Dumped During A Pandemic

Of dogs and people in the pandemic

Of dogs and their humans: Late life in a more-than-human world of the COVID-19 pandemic

Stephen King on why he’s sorry that you feel like you’re stuck in one of his horror novels:

Stephen King Is Sorry You Feel Like You’re Stuck In A Stephen King Novel

Tom Perrotta (author of The Leftovers) on epidemics, religion and meaning: Tom Perrotta on ‘The Leftovers’ and how we behave in times of fear and loss

Short video: A brief meditation on humanity, the environment, and the pandemic: https://youtu.be/f5on3AZWdik

The Wolves of Stanislav: An Improbably True Parable for the Pandemic Age by Paul Auster https://lithub.com/the-wolves-of-stanislav-an-improbably-true-parable-for-the-pandemic-age/?utm_source=pocket&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=pockethits

The Nocturnists podcast:

‎The Nocturnists on Apple Podcasts

Video diary of a NYC EM physician:

Inside a New York ER where the hallways are filled with covid-19 patients | Voices from the Pandemic

Hospital Chaplains During the Coronavirus Pandemic:

https://www.newyorker.com/news/on-religion/the-plight-of-a-hospital-chaplain?utm_source=nl&utm_brand=tny&utm_mailing=TNY_Daily_031420&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_medium=email&bxid=5be9d5a02ddf9c72dc1f3e5f&cndid=26443064&hasha=b099feec2a05003cc974d6936bfcc075&hashb=dbbe74a73e95fa88bee845e745ec3c72def430f5&hashc=ba7dac7b4e2f383f847685ec757cc1902b33d20f4cd7ca58f07a930015b05dcd&esrc=&utm_term=TNY_Daily

Here in spirit: oral history of faith amid a pandemic:

https://www.wired.com/story/here-in-spirit-oral-history-of-faith-amid-pandemic/?bxid=5c5b21f92ddf9c2e3579c781&cndid=17027253&esrc=&source=EDT_WIR_NEWSLETTER_0_BACKCHANNEL_ZZ&utm_brand=wired&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_mailing=WIR_Backchannel_041220_TopClickers&utm_medium=email&utm_source=nl&utm_term=WIR_TopClickers_EXCLUDE_Backchannel

Adapting to the new normal:

https://elladawson.com/2020/03/22/these-are-not-conditions-in-which-to-thrive/?mc_cid=ffdfbc31bc&mc_eid=7b1a58b0d5

The Road” Wakley Prize winner (Lancet): https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(05)67892-0/fulltext

Parts of Idaho experienced an early surge in cases:

https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/annehelenpetersen/coronavirus-covid-19-idaho-blaine-county-sun-valley?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=WYM-04132020-DYNAMIC-A&utm_term=what_you_missed_A

Ethics and Professional Identity

NY Magazine on ethical choices with COVID-19 patients and possible PTSD in health care providers (moral distress): ACA Architect Ezekiel Emanuel on Coronavirus Triage Ethics

“Making the Call” Podcast with Zeke Emmanuel and Jonathan Moreno on COVID-19 and ethics: ‎Making the Call on Apple Podcasts

When your spouse works in the ED: open.https://slate.com/human-interest/2020/04/coronavirus-emergency-room-doctors-nurses-spouses-conversation.html?sid=5388f4efdd52b8e411013658&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&utm_content=TheSlatest&utm_campaign=traffic

Emergency room physician loses  custody of her four year old due to Covid fears:

An ER doctor loses custody of daughter because of coronavirus fears

Professional identity: dealing with work/home balance (graphic art)

The bittersweet wait for coronavirus to bring its death and suffering

Malm, Heidi, Thomas May, Leslie P. Francis, Saad B. Omer, Daniel A. Salmon & Robert Hood.  “Ethics, Pandemics, and the Duty to Treat, The American Journal of Bioethics (2008), 8:8, 4-19, DOI: 10.1080/15265160802317974 Full text available via Taylor and Francis Online.

Should medical students continue their training during the epidemic?

Should Medical Students Continue Clinical Rotations During the COVID-19 Pandemic?

And a rejoinder:

Medical Ethics in the Time of COVID-19: A Call for Critical Reflection

Ethics, Covid-19, and moral injury:

Doctors are making life-and-death choices over coronavirus patients – it could have long-term consequences for them

Psychology, Coping, Vulnerability and Risk

Coping with the stress of the pandemic:

https://www.medpagetoday.com/infectiousdisease/covid19/85660?xid=nl_popmed_2020-04-16&eun=g327489d0r&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CoronaBreak_041620&utm_term=NL_Daily_Breaking_News_Active

Medical anthropologist on why we wear masks:

Opinion | The Social Life of Coronavirus Masks

Counterphobic reactions to danger (an ironic face mask design comment):

Using an ‘Alien’ Facehugger As a Protective Face Mask

Why do so many people believe in SARS-CoV-2 conspiracy theories?

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/world/europe/coronavirus-conspiracy-theories.html?action=click&module=News&pgtype=Homepage&fbclid=IwAR1HCp7zVpQwNFtCmPwBMfSYY5vaEXJ6CbbqgJDl_OwWHtRlaAFKAoQdNOY

5G Conspiracy Theories: Pressure of a pandemic brings old fears of new wireless tech into the

Celebs share rumors linking 5G to coronavirus, nutjobs burn cell towers

The illusion of perfect protection:

https://www.wired.com/story/bulletproof-vest-illusion-of-perfect-protection/?utm_source=nl&utm_brand=wired&utm_mailing=WIR_Backchannel_041220_TopClickers&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_medium=email&bxid=5c5b21f92ddf9c2e3579c781&cndid=17027253&esrc=&source=EDT_WIR_NEWSLETTER_0_BACKCHANNEL_ZZ&utm_term=WIR_TopClickers_EXCLUDE_Backchannel

Math and appreciating risk:

https://theconversation.com/math-misconceptions-may-lead-people-to-underestimate-the-true-threat-of-covid-19-134520?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20April%2010%202020%20-%201591115235&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20April%2010%202020%20-%201591115235+Version+A+CID_067172bb28572d35d3f56edcd17df24f&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=Math%20misconceptions%20may%20lead%20people%20to%20underestimate%20the%20true%20threat%20of%20COVID-19

What numbers can we trust, and which should ignore?

Coronavirus statistics: what can we trust and what should we ignore?

Protecting yourself from disinformation:

https://theconversation.com/4-ways-to-protect-yourself-from-disinformation-130767

The rise of false hopes and hydroxychloroquine:

Analysis | How false hope spread about hydroxychloroquine to treat covid-19 — and the consequences that followed

Looking Ahead

How Covid-19 is remaking social relationships, ethics and history:

Coronavirus: How COVID-19 is changing the world – Monash Lens

Who Will We Be This Time Next Year? On Pandemic Times and the Life to Come

André Aciman: Who Will We Be This Time Next Year?

What if Covid-19 Returns Every Year, Like the Common Cold?

https://www.wired.com/story/what-if-covid-19-returns-every-year-like-the-common-cold/?bxid=5c5b21f92ddf9c2e3579c781&cndid=17027253&esrc=AUTO_PRINT&source=EDT_WIR_NEWSLETTER_0_DAILY_ZZ&utm_brand=wired&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_mailing=WIR_Daily_041520&utm_medium=email&utm_source=nl&utm_term=list1_p4

How will the Covid-19 epidemic end?

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2020/03/how-will-coronavirus-end/608719/

The difficulty of modeling the epidemic:

Why It’s So Freaking Hard To Make A Good COVID-19 Model

More about forecasting the end of the pandemic:

Our Pandemic Summer

Pandemic offers a chance to remake cities:

https://www.wired.com/story/pandemic-opportunity-remake-cities/?bxid=5c5b21f92ddf9c2e3579c781&cndid=17027253&esrc=AUTO_PRINT&source=EDT_WIR_NEWSLETTER_0_DAILY_ZZ&utm_brand=wired&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_mailing=WIR_Daily_041320&utm_medium=email&utm_source=nl&utm_term=list1_p4

(Economics) Where we could go from here?:

Pandemic Response Requires Post-Growth Economic Thinking

Humor

The FIRST lines of 10 classic novels, rewritten for social distancing:

The first lines of 10 classic novels, rewritten for social distancing.

The LAST lines of 10 classic novels, rewritten for social distancing:

Okay, now the LAST lines of 10 classic novels, rewritten for social distancing.

Film in the age of COVID-19:

https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2020/mar/24/from-fight-club-to-brief-encounter-how-self-isolation-would-change-classic-films?utm_term=RWRpdG9yaWFsX0ZpbG1Ub2RheS0yMDAzMjQ%3D&utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=FilmToday&CMP=filmtoday_email

Nature is healing/We are the virus meme:

The Coronavirus “Nature Is Healing” Meme’s Backstory

Links to Other Syllabi

Northeastern University Coronavirus Humanities Reader:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1UeAN5jhSib-CsP17keNC6c3iMF7PgE3KDDDBy24w0xY/edit?usp=sharing

A crowdsourced cross-disciplinary resource:

#coronavirussyllabus

*Adapting ANTH101 Challenges for Covid-19 (Cultural Anthropology for Everyone). Michael Wesch (2008 U.S. Professor of Year), University of Kansas State, USA

*Archaeology of Epidemics Syllabus, University of Washington

*Assignment: A Day in the Life of a Pandemic: COVID-19 Assignment, Natalia Molina, University of Southern California.

*Bibliography: Coronaviruses • SARS • MERS • COVID-19

*Care in Uncertain Times Syllabus, Limited Open-Access Books from Duke University Press.

*#coronavirussyllabusk12 (K-12 Teaching Resources)

*Coronavirus Tech Handbook

*Disability Justice Framework COVID-19 Resources

*Economic History Review Limited Open-Access articles on Epidemics, Disease and Mortality in Economic History

*Ethics Resources on the Coronavirus (COVID-19), The Hastings Center.

*Feminist Resources on the Pandemic, Centre for Feminist Foreign Policy (UK)

*Humanities Coronavirus Syllabus

*Lessons from Ebola: Preventing the Next Pandemic (free online course from Harvard via edX)

*NBER Collection on Economic and Other Consequences of Previous Epidemics, National Bureau of Economic Research.

*Politics of Plague Course Syllabus, Patricia Stapelton, Social Science and Policy Studies Department, Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

*Public Collection of COVID-19 Citations, Yale University Medical Library

*Queering the Pandemic Syllabus

*Teaching Coronavirus—Sociological Syllabus Project

*Teaching COVID-19: A Collaborative Anthropology Syllabus Project, Teaching and Learning Anthropology Journal.

*The Black Death: Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World

*The Emergence of Global Health

COVID AND THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES-MAKING MEANING

Please share a wonderful resource found at this link:

Open source #Coronavirus syllabus

It’s curated beautifully and broken down as follows :

“Teach the virus,” Anne Fausto-Sterling

Table of Contents 

Articles and Books               1

Symposia 12

Podcasts and Radio 12 

Film 13

Visual Arts 14

Music 14

Literature 15

Archives and Databases 16

Syllabi and Other Resources 16

Lectures and Fora 18