COVID AND THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES-MAKING MEANING

Please share a wonderful resource found at this link:

Open source #Coronavirus syllabus

It’s curated beautifully and broken down as follows :

“Teach the virus,” Anne Fausto-Sterling

Table of Contents 

Articles and Books               1

Symposia 12

Podcasts and Radio 12 

Film 13

Visual Arts 14

Music 14

Literature 15

Archives and Databases 16

Syllabi and Other Resources 16

Lectures and Fora 18

Virtual Creative Writing Group For Residents 🗓

University of Toronto Residents’ Creative Writing Group

Are you interested in stretching your creative muscles? Looking to refine a creative work for publication? Or perhaps just to inject a dose of humanities into your medical practice?

The University of Toronto Residents’ Creative Writing Group is here to help! Now, more than ever, is a time for us to hone skills for self-expression.

We comprise of a group of residents and fellows at the University of Toronto interested in sharing and improving our writing. Meetings are held approximately once a month, 2 hours in length.

We welcome residents/fellows from any specialty, and with an interest in any genre of writing (narrative medicine pieces, poetry, fiction, memoir, creative non-fiction) as long as it’s written to be read.

Given the current public health landscape, our next meeting will be held over Zoom on Monday, April 20th, 2020 at 7:00pm. For this meeting, we will be joined by a very accomplished medical writer and current CMAJ Humanities Editor, Barbara Sibbald.

Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/862157092

If you wish to attend or would like more information, please join our facebook group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/1490804187882797/) or email me at jonah.himelfarb@mail.utoronto.ca.

Happy writing!

Jonah

Jonah Himelfarb
Internal Medicine Resident
University of Toronto
Jonah.Himelfarb@mail.utoronto.ca

JHI Working Groups Call for Applications for 2020-2021

FROM THE JACKMAN HUMANITIES INSTITUTE:

Dear Colleagues:
 
Please share this information with your continuing faculty members and doctoral students.
 
The Jackman Humanities Institute is now accepting applications for Working Groups in 2020-2021.  This program provides a $3,000 grant to interdisciplinary groups of faculty members and graduate students who wish to meet monthly in the coming year to discuss a scholarly topic of their choice.
 
Working Groups are NOT required to focus on an area that is relevant to the JHI’s annual theme.
Applications may be submitted by graduate students, and graduate students may take the leadership role in a group, but funds must be managed by a member of the continuing faculty.
 
The application is on the JHI website:
Call for Proposals Jackman Humanities Institute Working Groups, 2020-2021 Applications will be accepted starting Wednesday 15 April 2020 DEADLINE:  Friday 15 May 2020
The deadline for applications is 15 May.
 
Please don’t hesitate to contact myself, or Director Alison Keith (jhi.director@utoronto.ca), if any questions should arise.
 
Dr. Kimberley Yates, Associate Director
Jackman Humanities Institute, University of Toronto
170 St. George Street, Room 1029
Toronto, ON M5R 2M8

jhi.associate@utoronto.ca

Poetry and Healing APRIL 2020 – Listen to these broadcasts from the LCP/Sick Kids

Poetry and Healing – log in here for weekly broadcasts :

http://poets.ca/poetry-and-healing/

Poetry throughout the ages has been prophetic, beautiful as well as healing. With the outbreak of COVID-19, we feel it is best to postpone the Poetry and Healing event for the safety of those involved, and those on the frontlines. But, we want to continue to support SickKids, and bring together the poetry community for good during these difficult times.

Throughout the month of April, join Kate Marshall Flaherty, Al Moritz (Poet Laureate of Toronto), Luciano Iacobelli, Lois Lorimer, Daniel David Moses, Ronna Bloom, Rajinderpal S. Pal, Catherine Graham, Dr. Conor Mc Donnell, Jacob Shier, Ayesha Chatterjee, Corrado Paina and Grace Ma in celebrating the healing power of poetry.

Support poetry and SickKids Hospital from your home.

The League is also looking for donations to SickKids as a part of this event fundraiser, and especially in these difficult times of outbreak and isolation.

Donate to SickKids here

Poets will be sharing recordings of their poetry throughout April, and within it, the healing journey of writing, or reading, or sharing, poetry. With Poetry & Healing, we all can explore the indigenous concept of “medicine,” the healing power of words, and the transformative and inspiring power of poetry.

Follow this page as well as the League on Facebook for memorable poetry for a wonderful cause — all April long!

APRIL IS POETRY MONTH

APRIL IS POETRY MONTH  with  

WWW.HEALTH-HUMANITIES.COM

Two Online Writing and Reflection workshops in April with Ronna  Bloom have expanded availability for virtual/online participation !

1) Postcards from the Edge: Addressing Compassion Fatigue in Note Form
 

Perhaps you are too overwhelmed to read this? Let’s be brief: this workshop will address impacts, physical or emotional, personal or professional, of caring for human suffering. In notes. A creative writing workshop. With other hesitant people. Using poems as guides. Have a rest; write something. No experience necessary.

Time and place:
April 15, 2020 6PM-8PM
Via Zoom
with Ronna Bloom-April 15, 2020 (See Ronna’s BIO below)
Open to all U of T Medical Students, Residents, and Learners from other disciplines.

To register contact ronna.bloom@utoronto.ca

2) Awake at Work  
In this session, use writing to explore how simply showing up and attending to your own experience is the starting point for attending to others. Through guided exercises, you’ll have the opportunity to notice your personal, professional, and physical responses –– whether you’re at a desk, in the community, or in a hospital room –– and to write about them in a reflective, open, non-evaluative way. See how being awake to yourself might help you be awake at work. No experience is necessary.

Time and place:
April 29, 2020
6PM-8PM

Via Zoom

Goals:
— Learn five rules for writing that can be used to reflect on one’s work, relationships, and life
— Engage with poetry as a tool for understanding and expressing challenges
— Increase awareness of the impact of the professional on the personal, and the personal on the professional
— Explore poetry and writing as practices of self-care

Workshop Leader
Ronna Bloom is the author of six books of poetry, most recently, The More (Pedlar Press, 2017) long-listed for the City of Toronto Book Award. Her poems have been recorded by the CNIB and translated into Spanish, Bangla, and Chinese. She is currently Poet in Community to the University of Toronto and Poet in Residence in the Health, Arts and Humanities Program. Her “Spontaneous Poetry Booth” and “RX for Poetry” have been featured in hospitals, conferences and fundraisers in Canada and abroad. She runs workshops and gives talks on poetry, spontaneity, and awareness through writing. ronnabloom.com

Open to all U of T Medical Students, Residents, and Learners from other disciplines. Sign up for one or both.

  To register contact ronna.bloom@utoronto.ca

Awake at Work 🗓

In this session, use writing to explore how simply showing up and attending to your own experience is the starting point for attending to others. Through guided exercises, you’ll have the opportunity to notice your personal, professional, and physical responses –– whether you’re at a desk, in the community, or in a hospital room –– and to write about them in a reflective, open, non-evaluative way. See how being awake to yourself might help you be awake at work. No experience is necessary.

Time and place:
April 29, 2020
6PM-8PM
Via Zoom
 
Goals:
— Learn five rules for writing that can be used to reflect on one’s work, relationships, and life
— Engage with poetry as a tool for understanding and expressing challenges
— Increase awareness of the impact of the professional on the personal, and the personal on the professional
— Explore poetry and writing as practices of self-care

Workshop Leader
Ronna Bloom is the author of six books of poetry, most recently, The More (Pedlar Press, 2017) long-listed for the City of Toronto Book Award. Her poems have been recorded by the CNIB and translated into Spanish, Bangla, and Chinese. She is currently Poet in Community to the University of Toronto and Poet in Residence in the Health, Arts and Humanities Program. Her “Spontaneous Poetry Booth” and “RX for Poetry” have been featured in hospitals, conferences and fundraisers in Canada and abroad. She runs workshops and gives talks on poetry, spontaneity, and awareness through writing. ronnabloom.com

Open to all U of T Medical Students, Residents, and Learners from other disciplines. Sign up for one or both.

  To register contact ronna.bloom@utoronto.ca

Postcards from the Edge: Addressing Compassion Fatigue in Note Form 🗓

WORKSHOP with Ronna Bloom

Postcards from the Edge:

Addressing Compassion Fatigue in Note Form

*** PLEASE NOTE: Expanded availability for virtual/online participation ***

April 15, 2020

Perhaps you are too overwhelmed to read this? Let’s be brief: this workshop will address impacts, physical or emotional, personal or professional, of caring for human suffering. In notes. A creative writing workshop. With other hesitant people. Using poems as guides. Have a rest; write something. No experience necessary.

Via Zoom
with Ronna Bloom-April 15, 2020 (See Ronna’s BIO below)

Open to all U of T Medical Students, Residents, and Learners from other disciplines.

To register contact ronna.bloom@utoronto.ca

Ronna Bloom (Workshop Leader)

Ronna Bloom is the author of six books of poetry, most recently, The More (Pedlar Press, 2017) long-listed for the City of Toronto Book Award. Her poems have been recorded by the CNIB and translated into Spanish, Bangla, and Chinese. She is currently Poet in Community to the University of Toronto and Poet in Residence in the Health, Arts and Humanities Programme. Her “Spontaneous Poetry Booth” and “RX for Poetry” have been featured in hospitals, conferences and fundraisers in Canada and abroad. She runs workshops and gives talks on poetry, spontaneity, and awareness through writing.

ronnabloom.com

JHI Program for the Arts 2020-2021 FUNDING Deadline Extended

FROM THE JACKMAN HUMANITIES INSTITUTE

Dear Colleagues:
The deadline for applications for funding in 2020-2021 for the JHI Program for the Arts is now extended to 15 April 2020 at midnight. A couple of provisions have also been adjusted to make it possible to fund online events and to encourage applicants to consider contingency plans for their events, should regular operations not be feasible when the time comes.
Applications are welcome from all continuing teaching and research members of the faculty.
Could you please share the revised Call for Applications (attached, and copied in below this message) with your mailing list to faculty members?
Sincerely,
Kim

—–
Dr. Kimberley Yates, Associate Director
Jackman Humanities Institute, University of Toronto
170 St. George Street, Room 1029
Toronto, ON M5R 2M8
—————————————————————–

 Call for Proposals — REVISED

The Jackman Humanities Institute Program for the Arts, 2020-2021

 Deadline for applications: EXTENDED TO 15 APRIL 

The Jackman Humanities Institute Program for the Arts supports a range of events from small (up to $3000) to larger (up to $10,000) designed to enhance, improve and raise the profile of the Arts at the University. Activities may include visitors, lecture series, symposia, exhibitions, performances, or other imaginative and arts initiatives, which will serve to foster the work of the Jackman Humanities Institute and to represent the leading scholarship of the humanities at the University of Toronto. Each year there will be a priority for at least one event that engages the wider public. The Program gives priority to activities that range across multiple units and across more than one campus. It does not support activities that are routine matters of the sort that individual academic units would normally fund (e.g. departmental colloquia, learned society meetings, etc.). The Program also prefers activities that are related to the 2020-2021 theme—Collectives—but will consider proposals with other foci. Applications will be evaluated for conceptual fit, methodology, and research outputs.  

Proposals that include contingency plans for remote access, or are designed to run via remote access will be given priority. 

2020 – 2021: Collectives

From political parties to literary coteries, from fan groups to sports teams, from terrorist organizations to online groups, our collectives, associations, and communities are multiform and complex. How do we band together and why? In teaming up, how does membership of a collective affect one’s own agency and standing – what do we lose, what do we gain? Can collectives truly be agents and how do group dynamics emerge? How do we balance the interests between collectives, of individuals and collectives, and of the individual within the collective?

 Applications are invited from appointed members of the continuing research and teaching faculty at the University of Toronto.  To apply:

1.     You must have an active userID account on the JHI website

https://humanities.utoronto.ca

2.     Complete the online application form at
https://humanities.utoronto.ca/funding/20-21_Program_for_the_Arts

3.     Upload a description and rationale including fit with 2020-2021 annual theme of Collectives

(500 words—FIRM limit on length)

4.     Upload a proposed budget outline showing all known sources of support 

To clarify some of the preferences of the Program the following guidelines will normally apply:

1.     Funding will be awarded from $1,000-$3,000 (small), $3,000-$5,000 (medium) or up to $10,000 (large). Projects with a total budget (including all sources) over $30,000 will not be supported.

2.     Interdisciplinary activities that reach across units, and across campuses are given priority.

3.     Subventions for academic publishing will not be considered at this time; exhibition catalogues that are part of a larger academic event are the only publication that will be considered for funding.

4.     Significant costs (over $3,000) for performers will not be funded.

 

5.     Events of an annual or continual nature that have previously been funded through the Jackman Humanities Institute Program for the Arts are normally eligible for one repeat year of funding; this need not be sequential.

6.     The JHI provides basic publicity package (in-house colour flyer on request, website event posting, JHI social media and newsletter, email announcement to departments and relevant EDU’s), and will make available the first-floor multipurpose room (seats 100) and tenth-floor meeting room (seats 25; weekdays 9-4 only) to all funded events.

7.     Costs for publicity and space rental will not normally be accepted as fundable budget items. A/V recordings of events funded by the Program for the Arts should be included as a regularly budgeted item in the budget proposal with an explanation of the research or pedagogical need for the recording included in the Description and Rationale document. The responsibility for arranging recordings will lie with the event organizer.

8.     Due to COVID-19 precautions, for 2020-2021, proposals that include either a contingency plan for remote access, or are designed to run via remote access, will be given priority. 

Questions?

For clarifications about this program, please contact JHI Director Professor Alison Keith at

jhi.director@utoronto.ca

For website assistance, please contact JHI Associate Director Dr. Kimberley Yates at jhi.associate@utoronto.ca

 

Applications due: Wednesday 15 April 2020 at midnight

Mary Seeman Award for Achievement in the Area of Psychiatry and the Humanities 

Deadline for submission: Wednesday April 15th

This award is intended to encourage creative and scholarly activity in the area of Psychiatry and the Humanities. The award is open to medical students, residents, fellows, and graduates of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto within three years after completion of their training, as well as staff who have graduated from other clinical programs and are within two years of completing their training. Criteria for the award include documented evidence of completed work or work in progress of artistic and/or scholarly merit which makes a contribution towards enhancing the appreciation of the human condition. Submissions will be judged on the basis or originality, creativity and relevance to psychiatry.

Please note only one submission per applicant will be accepted. The following guidelines are suggested to assist applicants:

  1. Contributions to scholarship in the area of Humanities and Psychiatry; for example, a critical review of the literature, an essay on a topic bridging the Humanities and Psychiatry or material relating to the History of Psychiatry.
  2. Evidence of creative activity in the area of Humanities and Psychiatry; for example, art or literature.
  3. A demonstration of the capacity to integrate interest in the area of Humanities and Psychiatry; for example, through the development of a program or a paper.

If applicants are uncertain about the suitability of a submission, they are encouraged to contact any of the committee members. Submissions will be judged by the committee, with outside consultation where appropriate.

The award consists of a certificate and a cheque for $500.00. Committee members include:

Dr. Ron Ruskin (Chair) Mount Sinai Hospital 416‐928‐0675
Dr. Rex Kay Mount Sinai Hospital 416‐966‐5285
Dr. Mary Seeman Centre for Addiction & Mental Health 416‐535‐8501 X4671
Dr. Paul Westlind Mount Sinai Hospital 416‐586‐4800 x8540

 

Applications should be addressed to:

Dr. Ron Ruskin
Department of Psychiatry
Mount Sinai Hospital
600 University Avenue, Toronto, M5G 1X5
(ronaldruskinmd@aol.com)

 

Narrative Rounds – Stories Turned into Case Studies and Case Files – EVENT POSTPONED 🗓

Please hold the date for our joint Department of Family and Community Medicine – Department of Psychiatry – Health and Humanities GRAND ROUNDS

June 5th, from 10:45 am-noon, followed by a book signing

18th Floor Auditorium

Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Ave

Our speaker is disability activist ELI CLARE

Title:  “Stories Turned into Case Studies and Case Files”

Biography

White, disabled, and genderqueer, Eli Clare lives near Lake Champlain in occupied Abenaki territory (currently known as Vermont) where he writes and proudly claims a penchant for rabble-rousing. He has written two books of creative non-fiction, Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure and Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness, and Liberation, and a collection of poetry, The Marrow’s Telling: Words in Motion, and has been published in many periodicals and anthologies. Eli speaks, teaches, and facilitates all over the United States and Canada at conferences, community events, and colleges about disability, queer and trans identities, and social justice. Among other pursuits, he has walked across the United States for peace, coordinated a rape prevention program, and helped organize the first ever Queerness and Disability Conference.

Poetry and Healing: A Benefit for Sick Kids Hospital at Supermarket in Kensington Market 🗓

FUNDRAISER April 5, 2020

Poetry and Healing: A Benefit for Sick Kids Hospital at Supermarket in Kensington Market 

Sick Kids Hospital and The League of Canadian Poets announces the inaugural fundraiser for Sick Kids hospital, ‘Poetry & Healing’.

Join us for an afternoon of poetry for a great cause.

12 poets share their poetry, and within it, the healing journey of writing, or reading, or sharing, poetry. This day explores the indigenous concept of “medicine,” the healing power of words, and the transformative and inspiring power of poetry.

The League of Canadian Poets presents:
Al Moritz, (Poet Laureate of Toronto), Luciano Iacobelli, Kate Marshall Flaherty, Lois Lorimer, Daniel David Moses, Ronna Bloom, Rajinderpal Pal, Catherine Graham, Dr. Conor McDonnell, Jacob Shier, Ayesha Chatterjee, Corrado Paina

April 5, 2020
Supermarket
268 Augusta Avenue

1pm-4pm