CINEMA MEDICA Workshop: Another Way of Seeing — How to Read & Discuss Film

Workshop: A New Way of Seeing — How to Read & Discuss Film

Saturday, December 7th, 2-4 pm

Mount Sinai Hospital, Room 939

Film and television are powerful media for storytelling, making use of a wide range of expressive tools to convey meaning and to evoke emotional responses. This workshop will offer a practical introduction on how to engage more deeply with film in both individual and group settings. Through a series of interactive exercises and guided viewing, learn strategies and descriptive language for performing a close reading of a film—examining aspects of form and narrative—and leading, or participating in, group discussions about film.

Facilitator bio:

Elysse Leonard is a film educator and programmer who works at the intersections between film, mental health, and community engagement. With a background in Psychology and Cinema Studies, she is passionate about creating inclusive, interdisciplinary spaces for folks to connect, learn, and express themselves through film. Elysse is the film education lead for the Health, Arts & Humanities programme. She also oversees TIFF’s Mental Health Outreach programme, which brings film screenings and film-craft workshops to mental health programs across Toronto.

Please register herehttps://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HK9CPFB

CINEMA MEDICA – Adaptations of Aging: Torching the Dusties & Piano Lessons

This event features a screening of two short films about aging, featuring adaptations of literary texts by Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro.

Filmmaker and educator Marlene Goldman will join us after the screening for a conversation about the art of adaptation, person-centered narratives of aging and, and film as a vehicle for knowledge translation and empathy.

Marlene Goldman is a writer, filmmaker, and English professor at the University of Toronto. Her most recent work examines the connection between shame and stigma, specifically as relates to age. Exploring her subject through the lenses of literature, film, street art, and technology, Dr. Goldman seeks to re-imagine marginalized identities while translating her research into accessible narrative forms.

Date & Time: Tuesday, November 26, 6:30-8pm

Location: 500 University Ave., Room 150

Cost: FREE

Please register via https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/3SGBTMC

About the films:

Torching the Dusties (2019)

Protestors have appeared outside the gates of Ambrosia Manor. From behind strange baby-faced masks, they issue a chillingly simple demand: it’s time for the residents of this posh retirement home to give up their space on earth. Based on the short story of the same name by Margaret Atwood, Torching the Dusties dramatizes issues arising from ageism, age-related macular degeneration, and Charles Bonnet Syndrome. The film was produced in partnership with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) and York University’s Centre for Research on Vision. Trailer

Piano Lessons (2017)

Nancy’s late for an appointment, and she’s lost the address. Yet her surroundings look oddly familiar. With the help of her beloved granddaughter Alex, Nancy must learn to navigate the strange new territory she finds herself in. Adapted from the short story In Sight of the Lake by Alice Munro, Piano Lessons insightfully and empathetically depicts the experience of people with age-related dementia. The film presents a person-centered perspective, emphasizing not the cognitive decline in people with late-onset dementia and Alzheimer’s but the capacity for meaningful relationships and the knowledge that endures.

Elysse Leonard
Senior Coordinator, Youth + Community Initiatives
Pronouns: she/her
TIFF-Scorsese-Akerman-Oshima
TIFF Bell Lightbox
Reitman Square

350 King Street West
Toronto, ON  M5V 3X5

Phone: 416.599.8433 ext.2246

email: eleonard@tiff.net
Website: www.tiff.net

CINEMA MEDICA Workshop: Another Way of Seeing — How to Read & Discuss Film

Workshop: A New Way of Seeing — How to Read & Discuss Film

Saturday, December 7th, 2-4pm
Mount Sinai Hospital, Room 939

Film and television are powerful media for storytelling, making use of a wide range of expressive tools to convey meaning and to evoke emotional responses. This workshop will offer a practical introduction on how to engage more deeply with film in both individual and group settings. Through a series of interactive exercises and guided viewing, learn strategies and descriptive language for performing a close reading of a film—examining aspects of form and narrative—and leading, or participating in, group discussions about film.

Facilitator bio:

Elysse Leonard is a film educator and programmer who works at the intersections between film, mental health, and community engagement. With a background in Psychology and Cinema Studies, she is passionate about creating inclusive, interdisciplinary spaces for folks to connect, learn, and express themselves through film. Elysse is the film education lead for the Health, Arts & Humanities programme. She also oversees TIFF’s Mental Health Outreach programme, which brings film screenings and film-craft workshops to mental health programs across Toronto.

Please register herehttps://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HK9CPFB

CINEMA MEDICA SCREENING November 26

CINEMA MEDICA Screening-RSVP below

Adaptations of Aging: Torching the Dusties & Piano Lessons

TTD-2-1024x500

This event features a screening of two short films about aging, featuring adaptations of literary texts by Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro. Filmmaker and educator Marlene Goldman will join us after the screening for a conversation about the art of adaptation, person-centered narratives of aging and, and film as a vehicle for knowledge translation and empathy.

Marlene Goldman is a writer, filmmaker, and English professor at the University of Toronto. Her most recent work examines the connection between shame and stigma, specifically as relates to age. Exploring her subject through the lenses of literature, film, street art, and technology, Dr. Goldman seeks to re-imagine marginalized identities while translating her research into accessible narrative forms.

Date & Time: Tuesday, November 26, 6:30-8pm

Location: 500 University Ave., Room 150

Cost: FREE

Please register via https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/3SGBTMC

About the films:

Torching the Dusties (2019)

Protestors have appeared outside the gates of Ambrosia Manor. From behind strange baby-faced masks, they issue a chillingly simple demand: it’s time for the residents of this posh retirement home to give up their space on earth. Based on the short story of the same name by Margaret Atwood, Torching the Dusties dramatizes issues arising from ageism, age-related macular degeneration, and Charles Bonnet Syndrome. The film was produced in partnership with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) and York University’s Centre for Research on Vision. Trailer

Piano Lessons (2017)

Nancy’s late for an appointment, and she’s lost the address. Yet her surroundings look oddly familiar. With the help of her beloved granddaughter Alex, Nancy must learn to navigate the strange new territory she finds herself in. Adapted from the short story In Sight of the Lake by Alice Munro, Piano Lessons insightfully and empathetically depicts the experience of people with age-related dementia. The film presents a person-centered perspective, emphasizing not the cognitive decline in people with late-onset dementia and Alzheimer’s but the capacity for meaningful relationships and the knowledge that endures.

Cinema Medica Presents: Bedside Manner screening

Join us for a screening of Bedside Manner (2016), a short film that explores the important role of performance in physician-patient encounters through the lens of standardized patient simulations. The screening will be accompanied by a discussion with the visiting filmmaker, Corinne Botz, and collaborator Dr. Alice Flaherty, who is a neurologist at Harvard.

RSVP here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/P3KHG7K 

Key learning themes:
Communication, e.g., empathy, professionalism
Performance and health outcomes, e.g., help-seeking behaviours, physician wellness
Person-centred approaches to care

Synopsis:

In the 18-minute film Bedside Manner (2016, Winner, Grand Jury Prize for Best Short at the DOC NYC Festival, Oscar-qualifying), director Corinne Botz explores doctor-patient encounters through the lens of standardized patient simulations. It broadens the traditional medical gaze to include doctors as well as patients. It creates an uncanny space in which viewers and participants suspend disbelief and rehearse for trauma.

The film begins with the repeated simulation of a case of delirium that highlights the wavering boundary between reality and art in medicine. Standardized patients and students connect in an ensemble performance of acting sick and playing doctor, yet the encounters are also real. The film’s protagonist, the neurologist Alice Flaherty, plays herself as a doctor, standardized patient, and real patient, and raises questions about the importance of acting well.

Presenters:

Corinne Botz is a Brooklyn-based photographic artist, writer and filmmaker, whose work has been shown internationally. She is on the faculty of the International Center of Photography and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Her best known book, The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death, first brought Frances Glessner Lee’s dioramas of violent death to the attention of the art world. The dioramas will be shown at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts this winter.

Alice Flaherty trained as a neurologist and now has a joint appointment in psychiatry. She has written three award-winning books, all of which have been translated into several languages. Two have been multiply dramatized. Her book The Midnight Disease explores the neurology of creativity. Flaherty is writing a book about the role of acting in both the art of medicine and the under-studied art of being a patient. In the course of her research she has appeared in over 25 television productions, and consulted on two Hollywood doctor show pilots.

Date: Monday, March 11, 6pm
Location: Mount Sinai Hospital (600 University Ave) – 18th floor auditorium
Time: 6:30-8pm

Cinema Medica Screening Feb 19 at 6pm

Bending the Arc (2017)

All are welcome – RSVP Below

Join us for a screening of Bending the Arc (2017), a documentary about the work two physicians and a social activist did to establish Partners in Health in Haiti. The screening will be followed by a short discussion period for those interested.
RSVP (free!) here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/XY552VQ

Film synopsis

30 years ago in Haiti, Dr. Paul Farmer, Dr. Jim Yong Kim, and activist Ophelia Dahl began a movement that would change global health forever. Bending the Arc tells their story.

Trailer: https://vimeo.com/234590618

This event is happening on Feb 19, 2019, at 6pm, at 500 University Ave., Room 140.

Admission is free, and there will be refreshments and snacks!

RSVP here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/XY552VQ

Cinema Medica Screening on Opioid Crisis-November 27

East Hastings Pharmacy: Film Screening and Interactive Panel Discussion

Join us for a panel discussion and screening of East Hastings Pharmacy (2012), which pertains to the opioid crisis in Canada. The screening (approximately 60 mins) will be followed by a panel discussion about the film, the opioid crisis, and the meaning of harm reduction, featuring the filmmaker and clinical experts in the topic (details TBD).

RSVP (free!) here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/JC5DNM2

Film synopsis
A blend of documentary and fiction, this film chronicles a typical pharmacy of the Vancouver Downtown Eastside, where most clients are on a treatment that requires taking daily doses of methadone witnessed by the pharmacist. East Hastings Pharmacy is a site of rituals and repeated interactions where quiet routine and confrontation follow each other in one continuous movement.

This event is happening on November 27, 2018, at 6pm, at 500 University Ave., Room 140. Admission is free, and there will be refreshments and snacks!

RSVP here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/JC5DNM2

The Mary Seeman Humanities Award 2019

Call for Submissions: Mary Seeman Humanities WRITING Award: 2019

The Mary Seeman Humanities Award: 2019: Deadline April 12, 2019

This award is intended to encourage creative and scholarly activity in the interface between the humanities and issues related to mental illness and emotional well-being. The award is open to students from Dentistry, Kinesiology and Physical Education, Medicine (including undergraduate, residents and fellows), Nursing, Medical Radiation Sciences, Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Pharmacy, psychology , Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, Social Work, Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Toronto, as well as students from medical humanities disciplines including literary studies, history, bio-ethics and disability studies. The award is based on documented evidence of completed work of artistic and/or scholarly merit that contributes to a better understanding of the human condition. Submissions will be judged on the basis of originality, creativity and relevance to mental health and illness.

Please note only one submission per applicant will be accepted.

The following guidelines are suggested to assist applicants in preparation of their submissions.

1. a) The submission must be sole-authored and previously unpublished. To qualify for inclusion the submission must be:
i. a scholarly essay in the area of humanities and mental illness

ii. a personal memoir, medical illness narrative

iii. a short story

iv. a description of program development that integrates humanities and mental health
All above formats may be illustrated, if appropriate, by drawings, photography or video but the core of the submission must be a well-written narrative
Word content of submitted narratives should be no greater than 4000 words.

If applicants are uncertain about the suitability of a submission, they are encouraged to contact any of the committee members. Submissions will be judged by the committee, with outside consultation where appropriate.

Deadline for submissions is April 12, 2019. The award consists of a certificate and cheque for $ 500.00

Prospective applications and queries should be addressed to:

Dr. Ron Ruskin Department of Psychiatry (ronaldruskinmd@aol.com) Mount Sinai Hospital 600 University Avenue, Toronto, M5G 1X5

Cinema Medica Presents: RADAR (Recovery Advocacy Documentary Action Research)

Cinema Medica Presents:

RADAR (Recovery Advocacy Documentary Action Research)

RADAR is a collective of consumer survivors and academics making short films about mental illness — a product of  a research project led by Dr. Robert Whitley of McGill University and The Douglas Mental Health University Institute in Montreal. One of the project’s main goals is to raise awareness and reduce stigma around mental illness by giving consumer survivors the opportunity to tell their own stories. For the past 18 months, RADAR has provided members of Sound Times Support Services in Toronto with equipment and training to allow them to conceive and produce their own short documentary videos about issues surrounding mental health.

Featuring a selection of short films created by consumer survivors followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers!

Admission is free but seating is limited.

Date: Tuesday, Jan 9th
Time: 7-9pm
Location: Mount Sinai Hospital, 9th floor, room 939

Cinema Medica screening – “SHIVERS” – October 10, 2017

Please join us for a screening of :

SHIVERS (directed by David Cronenberg, 1975)

October 10, 2017 7pm
Mount Sinai Hospital, 9th floor, Room 939

Admission free. All are welcome!

Join us for a very special screening of one of David Cronenberg’s earlier films, which is only shown infrequently. A lively discussion will follow.

Dr. Emil Hobbes is conducting unorthodox experiments with parasites for use in transplants. He believes that humanity has become over-rational and lost contact with its flesh and its instincts, so the effects of the alien organism he actually develops is a combination of aphrodisiac and venereal disease. Once implanted, it causes uncontrollable sexual desire in the host.

A classic of body horror, the film all takes place in an isolated luxury apartment building on an island off of Montreal. It reflects anxieties about an epidemic of infectious disease, cross-bred with good old-fashioned moral panic.

A truly Canadian pre-Halloween delight!

CINEMA MEDICA IS A MONTHLY FILM SERIES EXAMINING REPRESENTATIONS OF MEDICAL, SOCIAL  AND PSYCHOLOGICAL THEMES IN CINEMA.

The series is curated by Elysse Leonard MA ( Toronto International Film Festival) and Dr. Michael Tau ( Chief Resident in Psychiatry), in conjunction with the Program In Health, Arts and Humanities, University of Toronto.

Please join our list-serv to receive notices of future events. 

 Instructions to join can be found at  www.health-humanities.com 

Stand By For Tape Backup

Please join us on January 24th at 7pm for a screening and discussion of:

standbyfortapebackup

STAND BY FOR TAPE BACKUP (Hot Docs ’15) is a film about memory, death and re-runs, written and directed by Ross Sutherland.

Through repetition and the close reading of pop culture artifacts, this film gives form to the cognitive process of rumination in connection with grief. It demonstrates how individuals bring their own experiences to bear on the meaning they derive from media.

Related themes: narrative medicine, client/patient experience, mental health, grief, performance

2015 · 65 minutes · Cooper Centre (60 Murray St.), Classrooms A&B


Elysse Leonard
Coordinator, Reel Comfort Programme
TIFF Bell Lightbox
Reitman Square
350 King Street West
Toronto, ON M5V 3X5
Phone: 416.599.8433 ext.2246
email: eleonard@tiff.net
Website: www.tiff.net

CINEMA MEDICA-November 22 and offerings for 2016-17

Please join us November 22 at 7:00PM at the Cooper Centre –
60 Murray St, third floor Classrooms A and B for :

Dan and Margot

DAN AND MARGOT provides an intimate look into the life of a young modern woman struggling to take back the three years of her life that she lost to schizophrenia. With transparency and even humour, we will confront the notion of schizophrenia through a female character-driven portrayal that asks questions about the deep-seated stigmatization of mental illness within our culture and the way in which we all choose to cope with our past, present and future.

Margot gives a voice to the many relatable stories of mental illness as she demonstrates a person’s right to fail, living with one’s past traumas and hope, the key to human existence.

75 min. Filmmaker Chloe Sosa-Sims will be in attendance for a Q&A following the screening!

Co-presented by the TIFF Reel Comfort programme. For more info: http://danandmargot.com

HOLD THESE DATES FOR CINEMA MEDICA IN 2017 !

January 24, February 28th and March 21st  -Programming to be announced