NEXT MULTI-MEDIA IN MEDICINE-OCTOBER 28TH 🗓

Don’t’ Make A Scene: Mixed Media & Medicine goes to the Movies

sent on behalf of Jane Zhao & Conor Mc Donnell

Faculty, students, residents, come one come all. We invite you to join us for an exciting first foray into Film this year. People often discuss their favorite films but less frequently we hear conversation around the Scenes that Mean the Most. What are the standout scenes that shaped your life, contribute to how you engage with your work, your life, your family? Please bring a favorite scene or two for sharing on October 28th at 6:30pm. We are not big on rules but in the interest of safety we do ask the following:

  1. No long scenes: keep them under 2 minutes. We would prefer you bring two or three brief scenes rather than one long one.
  2. Sharing YouTube clips works best but please check the clip beforehand.
  3. Be prepared to discuss why this scene is important: when did you first see it? Who were you with? Why does it speak to you?
  4. No violence or vulgarity: this is not an invitation to make colleagues uncomfortable. While we are not in the business of censorship we will immediately remove inappropriate material.
  5. As always, be respectful; all choices and reasons for such are valid and welcome.

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://utoronto.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIpcuihrjwtE9AHX9BQMYoY5pu-lBZVyA9c

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. If you have any trouble registering please email: conor.mcdonnell@sickkids.ca

See you at the movies!

Conor & Jane

CINEMA MEDICA-OCTOBER 19TH VIRTUAL SCREENING (6pm) 🗓

Cinema Medica presents: The Diving Bell and the Butterfly 

Julian Schnabel’s The Diving Bell and the Butterfly depicts the life of Elle editor Jean-Dominique Bauby, who developed locked-in syndrome resulting from a stroke at age 43. The film is based on the 1997 memoir of the same name, which Bauby wrote over ten months by blinking his left eyelid. Subjective cinematography – the story is told from Bauby’s literal point of view – voiceover, and impressionistic sequences convey Bauby’s rich inner world and interactions with various health care providers with great empathy. The film takes place in the hospital in Berck-sur-Mer where Bauby was a patient, with the staff making appearances in the cast.

View the trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPlcQfglFJg

Date & Time: Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021 at 6pm.

How It Will Work: If you register, you will get a link to join us for the screening and discussion.

Register at https://forms.gle/31zfT2d6EtTfroxKA!

For more information, please contact Michael Tau: Michael.Tau@unityhealth.to

Cinema Medica – It’s Nothing: Spotlight on Eating Disorders and Mental Health 🗓

Cinema Medica (University of Toronto) presents… It’s Nothing: Spotlight on Eating Disorders and Mental Health

Join us for a virtual screening of the short film IT’S NOTHING, which screened at TIFF 2019. This film utilizes performance, sound, and metaphor to articulate the emotions, thoughts, and feelings of a young woman’s experience with an eating disorder. Following the screening, director Anna Maguire and writer Julia Lederer will participate in a Q&A about their creative process and their mutual interest in the expressive potential of both words and film.

Synopsis: A recent graduate is urged by an impossibly perfect woman to start digging a hole in a nearby park, setting in motion a chain of events that threaten her emotional balance and carefully maintained routines.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6kxMYXHN-k

 
Date & Time: Tuesday, March 30, 2021, 6pm to 7pm

How It Will Work: If you register, you will get a link to join us for the screening and discussion.

Cost: FREE!

Please RSVP Here:  https://forms.gle/7zgCTQ1n6a4vReHW9

Guests:

Anna Maguire
Anna is a British/Canadian writer, director and actress. Her directorial work has screened at festivals including TIFF, Palm Springs, PÖFF Black Nights and the BFI London Film Festival where she was nominated for Best Short with Your Mother and I in 2016. She has won awards at The London Short Film Festival, Thessaloniki, Rhode Island, and Underwire among others, was long listed for a BAFTA, and nominated for Best Short at the 2018 London Critics’ Circle Awards. As an actress, Anna recently performed in Kim Nguyen’s The Hummingbird Project alongside Salma Hayek, Jesse Eisenberg and Alexander Skarsgard and can be seen in the upcoming film Violation by Madeleine Sims-Fewer and Dusty Mancinelli. Anna is passionate about film education, especially in under-served communities.

Julia Lederer
I’m a writer. My plays have been acclaimed internationally and produced across North America in places including Los Angeles, Chicago, Alaska, New York, Boise, Toronto, and Paris. I’ve also written film and television. My films continue to screen at festivals worldwide, including The Toronto International Film Festival, Aesthetica Short Film Festival (UK), Cucalorus, Cinequest, Canadian Film Fest, and the Festival du Nouveau Cinéma. I worked on the 4th season of Kim’s Convenience as part of CBC’s Emerging Writers Room. I love what words can do. My favourite work to watch, read, and write is imaginative, poetic, and funny. It strives to see and understand our world, often from a sidestep outside it. I also write about feelings a lot, as they tend to drive everything, acknowledged or not.

The World is Bright – Hot Docs Ontario screening time 🗓

Please spread the word about the screening of this film directed by Ying Wang , which  film won the Emerging Canadian Filmmaker Award at Hot Docs :

https://www.hotdocs.ca/news/hd20-award-winners

The film tackles issues of mental health, isolation and immigration, and is even more relevant now when mental health problems have become a world crisis due to the COVID 19 pandemic.

For the Ontario Premiere, go to :  

https://boxoffice.hotdocs.ca/websales/pages/info.aspx?evtinfo=125201~741853d5-bf72-40a5-a015-09aded779383&ep=1

The tickets are on sale now and people can watch the film BETWEEN May 28 until June 26 at    https://www.hotdocs.ca/.

JHI Program for the Arts 2020-2021 FUNDING Deadline Extended

FROM THE JACKMAN HUMANITIES INSTITUTE

Dear Colleagues:
The deadline for applications for funding in 2020-2021 for the JHI Program for the Arts is now extended to 15 April 2020 at midnight. A couple of provisions have also been adjusted to make it possible to fund online events and to encourage applicants to consider contingency plans for their events, should regular operations not be feasible when the time comes.
Applications are welcome from all continuing teaching and research members of the faculty.
Could you please share the revised Call for Applications (attached, and copied in below this message) with your mailing list to faculty members?
Sincerely,
Kim

—–
Dr. Kimberley Yates, Associate Director
Jackman Humanities Institute, University of Toronto
170 St. George Street, Room 1029
Toronto, ON M5R 2M8
—————————————————————–

 Call for Proposals — REVISED

The Jackman Humanities Institute Program for the Arts, 2020-2021

 Deadline for applications: EXTENDED TO 15 APRIL 

The Jackman Humanities Institute Program for the Arts supports a range of events from small (up to $3000) to larger (up to $10,000) designed to enhance, improve and raise the profile of the Arts at the University. Activities may include visitors, lecture series, symposia, exhibitions, performances, or other imaginative and arts initiatives, which will serve to foster the work of the Jackman Humanities Institute and to represent the leading scholarship of the humanities at the University of Toronto. Each year there will be a priority for at least one event that engages the wider public. The Program gives priority to activities that range across multiple units and across more than one campus. It does not support activities that are routine matters of the sort that individual academic units would normally fund (e.g. departmental colloquia, learned society meetings, etc.). The Program also prefers activities that are related to the 2020-2021 theme—Collectives—but will consider proposals with other foci. Applications will be evaluated for conceptual fit, methodology, and research outputs.  

Proposals that include contingency plans for remote access, or are designed to run via remote access will be given priority. 

2020 – 2021: Collectives

From political parties to literary coteries, from fan groups to sports teams, from terrorist organizations to online groups, our collectives, associations, and communities are multiform and complex. How do we band together and why? In teaming up, how does membership of a collective affect one’s own agency and standing – what do we lose, what do we gain? Can collectives truly be agents and how do group dynamics emerge? How do we balance the interests between collectives, of individuals and collectives, and of the individual within the collective?

 Applications are invited from appointed members of the continuing research and teaching faculty at the University of Toronto.  To apply:

1.     You must have an active userID account on the JHI website

https://humanities.utoronto.ca

2.     Complete the online application form at
https://humanities.utoronto.ca/funding/20-21_Program_for_the_Arts

3.     Upload a description and rationale including fit with 2020-2021 annual theme of Collectives

(500 words—FIRM limit on length)

4.     Upload a proposed budget outline showing all known sources of support 

To clarify some of the preferences of the Program the following guidelines will normally apply:

1.     Funding will be awarded from $1,000-$3,000 (small), $3,000-$5,000 (medium) or up to $10,000 (large). Projects with a total budget (including all sources) over $30,000 will not be supported.

2.     Interdisciplinary activities that reach across units, and across campuses are given priority.

3.     Subventions for academic publishing will not be considered at this time; exhibition catalogues that are part of a larger academic event are the only publication that will be considered for funding.

4.     Significant costs (over $3,000) for performers will not be funded.

 

5.     Events of an annual or continual nature that have previously been funded through the Jackman Humanities Institute Program for the Arts are normally eligible for one repeat year of funding; this need not be sequential.

6.     The JHI provides basic publicity package (in-house colour flyer on request, website event posting, JHI social media and newsletter, email announcement to departments and relevant EDU’s), and will make available the first-floor multipurpose room (seats 100) and tenth-floor meeting room (seats 25; weekdays 9-4 only) to all funded events.

7.     Costs for publicity and space rental will not normally be accepted as fundable budget items. A/V recordings of events funded by the Program for the Arts should be included as a regularly budgeted item in the budget proposal with an explanation of the research or pedagogical need for the recording included in the Description and Rationale document. The responsibility for arranging recordings will lie with the event organizer.

8.     Due to COVID-19 precautions, for 2020-2021, proposals that include either a contingency plan for remote access, or are designed to run via remote access, will be given priority. 

Questions?

For clarifications about this program, please contact JHI Director Professor Alison Keith at

jhi.director@utoronto.ca

For website assistance, please contact JHI Associate Director Dr. Kimberley Yates at jhi.associate@utoronto.ca

 

Applications due: Wednesday 15 April 2020 at midnight

CINEMA MEDICA – Adaptations of Aging: Torching the Dusties & Piano Lessons

This event features a screening of two short films about aging, featuring adaptations of literary texts by Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro.

Filmmaker and educator Marlene Goldman will join us after the screening for a conversation about the art of adaptation, person-centered narratives of aging and, and film as a vehicle for knowledge translation and empathy.

Marlene Goldman is a writer, filmmaker, and English professor at the University of Toronto. Her most recent work examines the connection between shame and stigma, specifically as relates to age. Exploring her subject through the lenses of literature, film, street art, and technology, Dr. Goldman seeks to re-imagine marginalized identities while translating her research into accessible narrative forms.

Date & Time: Tuesday, November 26, 6:30-8pm

Location: 500 University Ave., Room 150

Cost: FREE

Please register via https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/3SGBTMC

About the films:

Torching the Dusties (2019)

Protestors have appeared outside the gates of Ambrosia Manor. From behind strange baby-faced masks, they issue a chillingly simple demand: it’s time for the residents of this posh retirement home to give up their space on earth. Based on the short story of the same name by Margaret Atwood, Torching the Dusties dramatizes issues arising from ageism, age-related macular degeneration, and Charles Bonnet Syndrome. The film was produced in partnership with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) and York University’s Centre for Research on Vision. Trailer

Piano Lessons (2017)

Nancy’s late for an appointment, and she’s lost the address. Yet her surroundings look oddly familiar. With the help of her beloved granddaughter Alex, Nancy must learn to navigate the strange new territory she finds herself in. Adapted from the short story In Sight of the Lake by Alice Munro, Piano Lessons insightfully and empathetically depicts the experience of people with age-related dementia. The film presents a person-centered perspective, emphasizing not the cognitive decline in people with late-onset dementia and Alzheimer’s but the capacity for meaningful relationships and the knowledge that endures.

Elysse Leonard
Senior Coordinator, Youth + Community Initiatives
Pronouns: she/her
TIFF-Scorsese-Akerman-Oshima
TIFF Bell Lightbox
Reitman Square

350 King Street West
Toronto, ON  M5V 3X5

Phone: 416.599.8433 ext.2246

email: eleonard@tiff.net
Website: www.tiff.net

FRAGMENTS TICKETS AVAILABLE – OPENING SOON!

An immersive theatre experience inspired by the psychiatric writing of Frantz Fanon.

Here are the Fragments.
Co-produced by The ECT Collective and The Theatre Centre
November 19-December 1, 2019
Tickets: Preview $17 | Student/senior/arts worker $22 | Adult $30
Service charges may apply
Book 416-538-0988 | PURCHASE ONLINE

An immigrant psychiatrist develops psychosis and then schizophrenia. He walks a long path towards reconnection with himself, his son, and humanity.

Walk with him.

Within our immersive design (a fabric of sound, video, and live actors) lean in close to the possibilities of perceptual experience.

Schizophrenics ‘hear voices’. Schizophrenics fear loss of control over their own thoughts and bodies. But how does any one of us actually separate internal and external voices? How do we trust what we see or feel? How do we know which voices are truly our own?

Within the installation find places of retreat from chaos. Find poetry. Find critical analysis.

Explore archival material, Fanon’s writings and contemporary interviews with psychiatrists, neuroscientists, artists, and people living with schizophrenia, to reflect on the relationships between identity, history, racism and mental health.

Please consider supporting Here are the Fragments.

To realize this ambitious design and create a work of art
that will promote understanding, empathy and curiosity
instead of fear and stigma, we need your help.

THE IMPACT

Your support will help us:

▪ Support our brilliant artists at a level commensurate to their talents
▪ Extend outreach initiatives to communities most impacted by mental health challenges
▪ Offer community showings, expert and community panels to stimulate discussion and catalyze positive changes
▪ Support video and audio technologies required to create a fully immersive audience experience
▪ Develop an archive of this rich work for a future life online

Thank you for supporting the creative team behind Here are the Fragments!

Donations are made to The Theatre Centre, a registered charitable organization, and are fully tax deductible.

DONATE NOW

BOOK SEATS

Credits
Writer: Suvendrini Lena
Co-Director: Leah Cherniak
Co-Director: Mumbi Tindyebwa Out
Assistant Director: Abigail Whitney
Production Manager: Rebecca Vandevelde
Set and Video Designer: Trevor Schwellnus
Lighting Designer: Shawn Henry
Sound Designer: Nick Murray
Stage Manager: Tara Mohan
Performers: Kwaku Adu-Poku, Peter Bailey, Allan Louis, Kyra Harper

Developed in Residency at The Theatre Centre by Suvendrini Lena with Co-creators Leah Cherniak, Trevor Schwellnus with Lyon Smith with support from: The Caanada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, Toronto Arts Council, Wuchien Michael Than Fund, CAMH Archives, and Residency’s lead sponsor, BMO Financial.

We also acknowledge the following artists who collaborated in the development process: Andre Sills, Jiv Paramsuram, Bilal Baig, Soheil Parsa, Carla B Melo, Peter Bailey, Kwaku Adu Poku and Alexander Thomas, David Austin.

Consulting Development Producer Ngozi Paul with Khadijah Salawu

Physician Collaborators: Araba Chintoh, Ademole Ademponle, David Goldbloom, Gary Remington, Patricia Cavanaugh, Ariel Graff.

About The Theatre Centre: The Theatre Centre is a nationally recognized live-arts incubator that serves as a research and development hub for the cultural sector. We are a public space, open and accessible to the people of our community, where citizens can imagine, debate, celebrate, protest, unite, and be responsible for inventing the future.

Donate Now to help support the growth of one of the city’s most vibrant theatre companies.

Café/Bar Hours: Monday to Friday 8AM-4PM, Saturday and Sunday 9AM-5PM, plus evenings during special events and performances.

Have you snagged your Café Appreciation Card? Pick one up at the Café next time you’re at The Theatre Centre. Buy 5 coffees, get one free. Buy 10 coffees, get a free ticket to a show!

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The Theatre Centre sits on the traditional lands of the Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and Huron-Wendat peoples.

 

©2019 The Theatre Centre | 1115 Queen St W, P.O. 232 Stn C, Toronto ON M6J 3P4

Panels:

Date: November 23, 2019

Title: Our Patients and Our Selves: Experiences of Racism Among Health Care Workers.

What: An opportunity for black health care workers and health care workers of color to reflect on how racism in the workplace affects us, in our personal lives, our lives as professionals and as advocates for our patients and communities.

Location: Theatre Centre Gallery

Time: 4:30-6:00 pm

Panelists:

Onye Nnorum Black Physicians Association of Ontario,

Natasha Williams Association of Black Psychologists

Donna Alexander CAMH/Black Health Alliance

Facilitator: Fatimah Jackson Best (Black Health Alliance)


Date:  November 26, 2019

Title: Physician Heal Thyself

Description: An evening for physicians, medical students and residents to engage in an open conversation about our own mental and physical fragility. What happens when physicians themselves suffer significant physical or mental illness? How do we begin to speak to each other about our experiences? How does this experience challenge and deepen our identities as healers. What kinds of support do we need?

We propose a facilitated discussion with panelists, reflecting diverse experiences within the academic medical community.

Panelists are to be identified. Organized with PGME and Medicine and Humanities Program.

Time: 6:30-7:30 pm discussion, 8:00 – 9:30 pm performance.

 

☑ Falling Through The Cracks – Greg’s Story – November 6

Falling Through the Cracks: Greg’s Story

LOCATION:
MOUNT SINAI HOSPITAL
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 6, 2019 AT 5:30 PM
18th Floor Auditorium
600 University Ave, Toronto

Falling Through the Cracks: Greg’s Story is a short film on Greg Price’s journey through the healthcare system. The film gives a glimpse of who Greg was and focuses on the events of his healthcare journey that ended in his unexpected and tragic death. In spite of the sadness of Greg’s Story, the message of the film is intended to inspire positive change and improvement in the healthcare system. We believe the film will resonate with the audience and create a platform for further dialogue. We hope people will feel empowered and challenge the status quo of the current healthcare system so we all end up with better care and outcomes.

EVENT DESCRIPTION:
Please join us in this combined Arts and Humanities in Medicine and MD Program Portfolio Faculty Development event!

We are excited to offer you exclusive screening to the short film “Falling through the Cracks” followed by a panel discussion. The panel discussion will be featuring a member from Greg Price’s family along with several physicians to facilitate the discussion and learning points from the film. Third year clinical clerks will be receiving a similar session the following day as part of their core clerkship day which includes the Portfolio session dedicated to Patient Safety and references this film.

LEARNING GOALS:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1. Enable learners to recognize the challenges that patients face when navigating the complex nature of the health care system
2. Allow students to identify opportunities to make necessary system-level changes to make care safer
3. Reflect on personal experiences with patient safety incidents as a resident or staff
4. Reflect on personal experiences with quality of care issues as a resident or staff
5. Anticipate how students may react to this film and share strategies to help them reflect on similar patient safety and QI challenges

All are welcome! Here is the link to the film trailer:
https://gregswings.ca/fttc-trailer/
Falling through the Cracks: The Greg Price Story

Free TIFF workshop – Oct 20

Workshop: Telling Trauma through Film & Art with Eva-Marie Stern

Sunday, October 20th, 2-4pm
TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King St. W)
3rd Floor, Learning Studios A & B

Film and art can be powerful ways to understand and express experiences that might otherwise be difficult to communicate. This companion workshop of Emily Kassie & Sophia Bush on A Girl Named C will explore strategies for using art and moving images to connect more deeply with your emotions, thoughts, and sensory experiences. Join art therapist and educator Eva-Marie Stern for a trauma-informed afternoon of making and engaging with art.

No cost. All are welcome to attend. You do not have to attend the preceding screening of A Girl Named C to participate in this workshop.

To reserve a spot, please email outreach@tiff.net.

Screening: Emily Kassie & Sophia Bush on A Girl Named C

Sunday, October 20, 12-2pm
TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King St. W)

At first, “C” could not remember what happened — she was only 11. Through vivid drawings and disturbing diary entries, her parents start to puzzle together the events of that day.

Using interviews and C’s own artwork, feature documentary A Girl Named C delves into the mind of a child as she struggles with the trauma of sexual assault, and turns to the creative arts to navigate the aftermath with her family’s support.

Denise Balkissoon will moderate an onstage discussion with director Emily Kassie and executive producer Sophia Bush after the film.

$14 General Admission | $11.50 Student/Senior
Tickets and more info: www.tiff.net/events/emily-kassie-on-a-girl-named-c


Elysse Leonard
Senior Coordinator, Youth + Community Initiatives
Pronouns: she/her

B7BA1DD8-1A72-43AE-A695-2300805CF659

TIFF Bell Lightbox
Reitman Square
350 King Street West
Toronto, ON M5V 3X5
Phone: 416.599.8433 ext.2246
email: eleonard@tiff.net
Website: www.tiff.net

CINEMA MEDICA SCREENING November 26

CINEMA MEDICA Screening-RSVP below

Adaptations of Aging: Torching the Dusties & Piano Lessons

TTD-2-1024x500

This event features a screening of two short films about aging, featuring adaptations of literary texts by Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro. Filmmaker and educator Marlene Goldman will join us after the screening for a conversation about the art of adaptation, person-centered narratives of aging and, and film as a vehicle for knowledge translation and empathy.

Marlene Goldman is a writer, filmmaker, and English professor at the University of Toronto. Her most recent work examines the connection between shame and stigma, specifically as relates to age. Exploring her subject through the lenses of literature, film, street art, and technology, Dr. Goldman seeks to re-imagine marginalized identities while translating her research into accessible narrative forms.

Date & Time: Tuesday, November 26, 6:30-8pm

Location: 500 University Ave., Room 150

Cost: FREE

Please register via https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/3SGBTMC

About the films:

Torching the Dusties (2019)

Protestors have appeared outside the gates of Ambrosia Manor. From behind strange baby-faced masks, they issue a chillingly simple demand: it’s time for the residents of this posh retirement home to give up their space on earth. Based on the short story of the same name by Margaret Atwood, Torching the Dusties dramatizes issues arising from ageism, age-related macular degeneration, and Charles Bonnet Syndrome. The film was produced in partnership with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) and York University’s Centre for Research on Vision. Trailer

Piano Lessons (2017)

Nancy’s late for an appointment, and she’s lost the address. Yet her surroundings look oddly familiar. With the help of her beloved granddaughter Alex, Nancy must learn to navigate the strange new territory she finds herself in. Adapted from the short story In Sight of the Lake by Alice Munro, Piano Lessons insightfully and empathetically depicts the experience of people with age-related dementia. The film presents a person-centered perspective, emphasizing not the cognitive decline in people with late-onset dementia and Alzheimer’s but the capacity for meaningful relationships and the knowledge that endures.

Cinema Medica Presents: Bedside Manner screening

Join us for a screening of Bedside Manner (2016), a short film that explores the important role of performance in physician-patient encounters through the lens of standardized patient simulations. The screening will be accompanied by a discussion with the visiting filmmaker, Corinne Botz, and collaborator Dr. Alice Flaherty, who is a neurologist at Harvard.

RSVP here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/P3KHG7K 

Key learning themes:
Communication, e.g., empathy, professionalism
Performance and health outcomes, e.g., help-seeking behaviours, physician wellness
Person-centred approaches to care

Synopsis:

In the 18-minute film Bedside Manner (2016, Winner, Grand Jury Prize for Best Short at the DOC NYC Festival, Oscar-qualifying), director Corinne Botz explores doctor-patient encounters through the lens of standardized patient simulations. It broadens the traditional medical gaze to include doctors as well as patients. It creates an uncanny space in which viewers and participants suspend disbelief and rehearse for trauma.

The film begins with the repeated simulation of a case of delirium that highlights the wavering boundary between reality and art in medicine. Standardized patients and students connect in an ensemble performance of acting sick and playing doctor, yet the encounters are also real. The film’s protagonist, the neurologist Alice Flaherty, plays herself as a doctor, standardized patient, and real patient, and raises questions about the importance of acting well.

Presenters:

Corinne Botz is a Brooklyn-based photographic artist, writer and filmmaker, whose work has been shown internationally. She is on the faculty of the International Center of Photography and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Her best known book, The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death, first brought Frances Glessner Lee’s dioramas of violent death to the attention of the art world. The dioramas will be shown at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts this winter.

Alice Flaherty trained as a neurologist and now has a joint appointment in psychiatry. She has written three award-winning books, all of which have been translated into several languages. Two have been multiply dramatized. Her book The Midnight Disease explores the neurology of creativity. Flaherty is writing a book about the role of acting in both the art of medicine and the under-studied art of being a patient. In the course of her research she has appeared in over 25 television productions, and consulted on two Hollywood doctor show pilots.

Date: Monday, March 11, 6pm
Location: Mount Sinai Hospital (600 University Ave) – 18th floor auditorium
Time: 6:30-8pm

Cinema Medica Screening on Opioid Crisis-November 27

East Hastings Pharmacy: Film Screening and Interactive Panel Discussion

Join us for a panel discussion and screening of East Hastings Pharmacy (2012), which pertains to the opioid crisis in Canada. The screening (approximately 60 mins) will be followed by a panel discussion about the film, the opioid crisis, and the meaning of harm reduction, featuring the filmmaker and clinical experts in the topic (details TBD).

RSVP (free!) here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/JC5DNM2

Film synopsis
A blend of documentary and fiction, this film chronicles a typical pharmacy of the Vancouver Downtown Eastside, where most clients are on a treatment that requires taking daily doses of methadone witnessed by the pharmacist. East Hastings Pharmacy is a site of rituals and repeated interactions where quiet routine and confrontation follow each other in one continuous movement.

This event is happening on November 27, 2018, at 6pm, at 500 University Ave., Room 140. Admission is free, and there will be refreshments and snacks!

RSVP here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/JC5DNM2