Awake at Work 🗓

In this session, use writing to explore how simply showing up and attending to your own experience is the starting point for attending to others. Through guided exercises, you’ll have the opportunity to notice your personal, professional, and physical responses –– whether you’re at a desk, in the community, or in a hospital room –– and to write about them in a reflective, open, non-evaluative way. See how being awake to yourself might help you be awake at work. No experience is necessary.

Time and place:
April 29, 2020
6PM-8PM
Via Zoom
 
Goals:
— Learn five rules for writing that can be used to reflect on one’s work, relationships, and life
— Engage with poetry as a tool for understanding and expressing challenges
— Increase awareness of the impact of the professional on the personal, and the personal on the professional
— Explore poetry and writing as practices of self-care

Workshop Leader
Ronna Bloom is the author of six books of poetry, most recently, The More (Pedlar Press, 2017) long-listed for the City of Toronto Book Award. Her poems have been recorded by the CNIB and translated into Spanish, Bangla, and Chinese. She is currently Poet in Community to the University of Toronto and Poet in Residence in the Health, Arts and Humanities Program. Her “Spontaneous Poetry Booth” and “RX for Poetry” have been featured in hospitals, conferences and fundraisers in Canada and abroad. She runs workshops and gives talks on poetry, spontaneity, and awareness through writing. ronnabloom.com

Open to all U of T Medical Students, Residents, and Learners from other disciplines. Sign up for one or both.

  To register contact ronna.bloom@utoronto.ca

Postcards from the Edge: Addressing Compassion Fatigue in Note Form 🗓

WORKSHOP with Ronna Bloom

Postcards from the Edge:

Addressing Compassion Fatigue in Note Form

*** PLEASE NOTE: Expanded availability for virtual/online participation ***

April 15, 2020

Perhaps you are too overwhelmed to read this? Let’s be brief: this workshop will address impacts, physical or emotional, personal or professional, of caring for human suffering. In notes. A creative writing workshop. With other hesitant people. Using poems as guides. Have a rest; write something. No experience necessary.

Via Zoom
with Ronna Bloom-April 15, 2020 (See Ronna’s BIO below)

Open to all U of T Medical Students, Residents, and Learners from other disciplines.

To register contact ronna.bloom@utoronto.ca

Ronna Bloom (Workshop Leader)

Ronna Bloom is the author of six books of poetry, most recently, The More (Pedlar Press, 2017) long-listed for the City of Toronto Book Award. Her poems have been recorded by the CNIB and translated into Spanish, Bangla, and Chinese. She is currently Poet in Community to the University of Toronto and Poet in Residence in the Health, Arts and Humanities Programme. Her “Spontaneous Poetry Booth” and “RX for Poetry” have been featured in hospitals, conferences and fundraisers in Canada and abroad. She runs workshops and gives talks on poetry, spontaneity, and awareness through writing.

ronnabloom.com

JHI Program for the Arts 2020-2021 FUNDING Deadline Extended

FROM THE JACKMAN HUMANITIES INSTITUTE

Dear Colleagues:
The deadline for applications for funding in 2020-2021 for the JHI Program for the Arts is now extended to 15 April 2020 at midnight. A couple of provisions have also been adjusted to make it possible to fund online events and to encourage applicants to consider contingency plans for their events, should regular operations not be feasible when the time comes.
Applications are welcome from all continuing teaching and research members of the faculty.
Could you please share the revised Call for Applications (attached, and copied in below this message) with your mailing list to faculty members?
Sincerely,
Kim

—–
Dr. Kimberley Yates, Associate Director
Jackman Humanities Institute, University of Toronto
170 St. George Street, Room 1029
Toronto, ON M5R 2M8
—————————————————————–

 Call for Proposals — REVISED

The Jackman Humanities Institute Program for the Arts, 2020-2021

 Deadline for applications: EXTENDED TO 15 APRIL 

The Jackman Humanities Institute Program for the Arts supports a range of events from small (up to $3000) to larger (up to $10,000) designed to enhance, improve and raise the profile of the Arts at the University. Activities may include visitors, lecture series, symposia, exhibitions, performances, or other imaginative and arts initiatives, which will serve to foster the work of the Jackman Humanities Institute and to represent the leading scholarship of the humanities at the University of Toronto. Each year there will be a priority for at least one event that engages the wider public. The Program gives priority to activities that range across multiple units and across more than one campus. It does not support activities that are routine matters of the sort that individual academic units would normally fund (e.g. departmental colloquia, learned society meetings, etc.). The Program also prefers activities that are related to the 2020-2021 theme—Collectives—but will consider proposals with other foci. Applications will be evaluated for conceptual fit, methodology, and research outputs.  

Proposals that include contingency plans for remote access, or are designed to run via remote access will be given priority. 

2020 – 2021: Collectives

From political parties to literary coteries, from fan groups to sports teams, from terrorist organizations to online groups, our collectives, associations, and communities are multiform and complex. How do we band together and why? In teaming up, how does membership of a collective affect one’s own agency and standing – what do we lose, what do we gain? Can collectives truly be agents and how do group dynamics emerge? How do we balance the interests between collectives, of individuals and collectives, and of the individual within the collective?

 Applications are invited from appointed members of the continuing research and teaching faculty at the University of Toronto.  To apply:

1.     You must have an active userID account on the JHI website

https://humanities.utoronto.ca

2.     Complete the online application form at
https://humanities.utoronto.ca/funding/20-21_Program_for_the_Arts

3.     Upload a description and rationale including fit with 2020-2021 annual theme of Collectives

(500 words—FIRM limit on length)

4.     Upload a proposed budget outline showing all known sources of support 

To clarify some of the preferences of the Program the following guidelines will normally apply:

1.     Funding will be awarded from $1,000-$3,000 (small), $3,000-$5,000 (medium) or up to $10,000 (large). Projects with a total budget (including all sources) over $30,000 will not be supported.

2.     Interdisciplinary activities that reach across units, and across campuses are given priority.

3.     Subventions for academic publishing will not be considered at this time; exhibition catalogues that are part of a larger academic event are the only publication that will be considered for funding.

4.     Significant costs (over $3,000) for performers will not be funded.

 

5.     Events of an annual or continual nature that have previously been funded through the Jackman Humanities Institute Program for the Arts are normally eligible for one repeat year of funding; this need not be sequential.

6.     The JHI provides basic publicity package (in-house colour flyer on request, website event posting, JHI social media and newsletter, email announcement to departments and relevant EDU’s), and will make available the first-floor multipurpose room (seats 100) and tenth-floor meeting room (seats 25; weekdays 9-4 only) to all funded events.

7.     Costs for publicity and space rental will not normally be accepted as fundable budget items. A/V recordings of events funded by the Program for the Arts should be included as a regularly budgeted item in the budget proposal with an explanation of the research or pedagogical need for the recording included in the Description and Rationale document. The responsibility for arranging recordings will lie with the event organizer.

8.     Due to COVID-19 precautions, for 2020-2021, proposals that include either a contingency plan for remote access, or are designed to run via remote access, will be given priority. 

Questions?

For clarifications about this program, please contact JHI Director Professor Alison Keith at

jhi.director@utoronto.ca

For website assistance, please contact JHI Associate Director Dr. Kimberley Yates at jhi.associate@utoronto.ca

 

Applications due: Wednesday 15 April 2020 at midnight

Narrative Rounds – Stories Turned into Case Studies and Case Files 🗓

Please hold the date for our joint Department of Family and Community Medicine – Department of Psychiatry – Health and Humanities GRAND ROUNDS

June 5th, from 10:45 am-noon, followed by a book signing

18th Floor Auditorium

Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Ave

Our speaker is disability activist ELI CLARE

Title:  “Stories Turned into Case Studies and Case Files”

Biography

White, disabled, and genderqueer, Eli Clare lives near Lake Champlain in occupied Abenaki territory (currently known as Vermont) where he writes and proudly claims a penchant for rabble-rousing. He has written two books of creative non-fiction, Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure and Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness, and Liberation, and a collection of poetry, The Marrow’s Telling: Words in Motion, and has been published in many periodicals and anthologies. Eli speaks, teaches, and facilitates all over the United States and Canada at conferences, community events, and colleges about disability, queer and trans identities, and social justice. Among other pursuits, he has walked across the United States for peace, coordinated a rape prevention program, and helped organize the first ever Queerness and Disability Conference.

Poetry and Healing: A Benefit for Sick Kids Hospital at Supermarket in Kensington Market 🗓

FUNDRAISER April 5, 2020

Poetry and Healing: A Benefit for Sick Kids Hospital at Supermarket in Kensington Market 

Sick Kids Hospital and The League of Canadian Poets announces the inaugural fundraiser for Sick Kids hospital, ‘Poetry & Healing’.

Join us for an afternoon of poetry for a great cause.

12 poets share their poetry, and within it, the healing journey of writing, or reading, or sharing, poetry. This day explores the indigenous concept of “medicine,” the healing power of words, and the transformative and inspiring power of poetry.

The League of Canadian Poets presents:
Al Moritz, (Poet Laureate of Toronto), Luciano Iacobelli, Kate Marshall Flaherty, Lois Lorimer, Daniel David Moses, Ronna Bloom, Rajinderpal Pal, Catherine Graham, Dr. Conor McDonnell, Jacob Shier, Ayesha Chatterjee, Corrado Paina

April 5, 2020
Supermarket
268 Augusta Avenue

1pm-4pm

Awake at Work 🗓

Writing/Poetry and Reflection for Medical Students, Residents, and Health Professionals:

Awake at Work

In this session, use writing to explore how simply showing up and attending to your own experience is the starting point for attending to others. Through guided exercises, you’ll have the opportunity to notice your personal, professional, and physical responses –– whether you’re at a desk, in the community, or in a hospital room –– and to write about them in a reflective, open, non-evaluative way. See how being awake to yourself might help you be awake at work. No experience is necessary.

Time and place:
March 25, 2020 6PM-8PM
Mount Sinai Hospital,
600 University Avenue, Toronto, ON CANADA
OT room 941

Narrative Atelier – June 2020 🗓

The NARRATIVE ATELIER (June 5-8, 2020) will incorporate these Rounds and a workshop by Eli Clare. The 4-day intensive Programme explores the theory, practice and teaching of Narrative-Based Medicine through the close interpretation and reading of :

  • Visual Narrative
  • Written and Reflective Narrative
  • Performed Narrative (Including Improv)
  • Cinematic Narrative
  • Journalistic Narrative
  • Modes of patient/client writing

To receive the finalized Atelier Program and to Register – please write to:
mspi.msh@sinaihealthsystem.ca

For more on the Narrative Atelier – see this article from the latest issue of the WALRUS:
https://thewalrus.ca/how-literature-can-lead-to-better-healthcare/

Allan D. Peterkin MD FCFP, FRCP
Professor of Psychiatry and Family Medicine,
Head, Health, Arts and Humanities Program and UGME/Post-MD Studies Humanities Lead

CFD Narrative Medicine Course-some spots remain

REGISTRATION CLOSES SOON!

Narrative Medicine: Reading, Writing, and Reflecting in Clinical Practice, Teaching, and Self-Care – open for registration!

NarrMed_Prog

Narrative medicine, both in medical practice and education, is practiced with a focus on the skills of communication and collaboration which are essential to positive health outcomes. Learning how to write and reflect more expertly gives practitioners a powerful skill with which to build therapeutic and collegial relationships, improve patient outcomes, and live and work in a more reflective and engaged way. This program is designed for healthcare practitioners looking to inform their professional practice with narrative approaches to health and medicine, and those seeking to explore creative and reflective writing for their own sake.

This program will introduce the theory and practice of Narrative Medicine through a variety of practical activities and discussion. Participants will be guided through in-class exercises in close reading, close listening, and creative and reflective writing.

This new program consists of seven 2.5-hour sessions and will require in-between-session homework and reading.

Registration is now open! There is an associated registration fee of $700. A maximum of 17 participants will be accepted into the program on a first come-first serve basis.

Download: [Narrative Medicine program info – Spring 2020]

Please register at https://cfd.utoronto.ca/fostering/details/6 or email Farah.Friesen@unityhealth.to for more information

Narrative Rounds June 5th and the Narrative Atelier – June 5-8, 2020

  1. Please hold the date for our joint DFCM – Department of Psychiatry – Health and Humanities GRAND ROUNDS

    June 5th, from 10:45 am-noon, followed by a book signing

    18th Floor Auditorium

    Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Ave

    Our speaker is disability activist ELI CLARE

    Title:  “Stories Turned into Case Studies and Case Files”

    Biography

    White, disabled, and genderqueer, Eli Clare lives near Lake Champlain in occupied Abenaki territory (currently known as Vermont) where he writes and proudly claims a penchant for rabble-rousing. He has written two books of creative non-fiction, Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure and Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness, and Liberation, and a collection of poetry, The Marrow’s Telling: Words in Motion, and has been published in many periodicals and anthologies. Eli speaks, teaches, and facilitates all over the United States and Canada at conferences, community events, and colleges about disability, queer and trans identities, and social justice. Among other pursuits, he has walked across the United States for peace, coordinated a rape prevention program, and helped organize the first ever Queerness and Disability Conference.

  2. The NARRATIVE ATELIER (June 5-8, 2020) will incorporate these Rounds and a workshop by Eli Clare.

    The 4-day intensive Programme explores the theory, practice and teaching  of Narrative-Based Medicine through the close interpretation and reading of :

    • *Visual Narrative
    • *Written and Reflective Narrative
    • *Performed Narrative (Including Improv)
    • *Cinematic Narrative
    • *Journalistic Narrative
    • *Modes of patient/client writing

    To receive the finalized Atelier Program and to Register – please write to:
    mspi.msh@sinaihealthsystem.ca

    For more on the Narrative Atelier – see this article from the latest issue of the WALRUS:
    https://thewalrus.ca/how-literature-can-lead-to-better-healthcare/

    Allan D. Peterkin MD FCFP, FRCP
    Professor of Psychiatry and Family Medicine,
    Head, Health, Arts and Humanities Program and UGME/Post-MD Studies Humanities Lead

NEW NARRATIVE MEDICINE WRITING WORKSHOP/WRITING COMMUNITY

A Rooster for Asclepius: The Toronto Health Humanities Writing Group*

A new monthly health humanities workshop, focused on improving narrative medicine skills through creative and reflective writing, close reading of health-related writing, sharing and reflection on participant work, and ongoing discussion of the goals and methods of narrative-based medicine.

Physicians and health practitioners from other clinical fields interested in collaborating to deepen their involvement in health humanities are encouraged to apply to join this new group. Space permitting, scholars, practitioners and theorists from arts and  humanities  disciplines with an interest in the culture of medicine and healthcare,  are also invited to apply.

Typical workshop sessions will include some combination of: in-class writing exercises; discussion of a published health-related piece (short story, personal essay, etc.); discussion of theory and practice of narrative medicine as related and experienced by participants; sharing of written work by participants with guided feedback on same; visits by guest speakers working in other artistic genres and cognate fields. There will also be ongoing discussion of and collaboration on related opportunities and events in the health humanities.

This is a workshop rather than a class—an ongoing collaborative effort—and one of the principal aims is to foster a creative and supportive narrative community in the GTA.

Between sessions, reading, writing and discussion will continue via an online forum/discussion board.

Space is limited, so please make sure you can commit to this writing group. Refunds will not be issued.

Time and Location: 

Workshop sessions will be 3 hours in length, held in the evening.

Meetings will take place on the third Wednesday of each month from September to May.

Fee:

$200 (membership fee for one academic year). Some spaces for residents and doctoral students will be made available free of charge.

 

Facilitator details:

Damian Tarnopolsky has taught courses in Narrative Medicine at the Centre for Faculty Development at St. Michael’s Hospital for several years, and led writing and reflection workshops for medical students and residents as the Barbara Moon Fellow at Massey College from 2016-19. His books, Goya’s Dog and Lanzmann and Stories, have been nominated for the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, the Amazon.ca First Novel Award, and the ReLit Award, among others, and his play The Defence won the 2019 Voaden Prize. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Toronto and has taught at Humber College and the School of Continuing Studies, where he was nominated for an Excellence in Teaching award. He works at Slingsby and Dixon, an editorial services company in Toronto.

 

How to apply:

Choose a health-related subject and write a 500-1000 word short story, personal essay,  poem/poems, dramatic scene, graphic medicine comic, or a piece in another genre of your choice.  Send your submission as a PDF or Word document to Damian Tarnopolsky at aroosterforasclepius@gmail.com  You will receive a response shortly thereafter.

 

*About the name of our writing group:

“Crito, we owe a rooster to Asclepius – pay it. Don’t forget.” – Plato, Phaedo, 118

As he went to face his death after being condemned by the Athenians, Socrates enjoined his friends to make a sacrifice to Asclepius, god of healing. It’s likely that with his last words he meant to say that he was grateful to be cured of the disease of life, and to pass into a realm of truth. It’s possible, however, that he was speaking ironically.

Narrative Rounds and Narrative Atelier June 2020

Narrative Rounds June 5th and the Narrative Atelier-June 5-8, 2020

Please hold the date for our joint DFCM -Department of Psychiatry – Health and Humanities NARRATIVE GRAND ROUNDS –  “Stories Turned into Case Studies and Case Files”

June 5, 1045 am-noon, followed  by a book signing

18th Floor Auditorium, Mount Sinai Hospital 600 University Ave

Our speaker is social and disability activist,  ELI CLARE

Biography:

White, disabled, and genderqueer, Eli Clare lives near Lake Champlain in occupied Abenaki territory (currently known as Vermont) where he writes and proudly claims a penchant for rabble-rousing. He has written two books of creative non-fiction, Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure and Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness, and Liberation, and a collection of poetry, The Marrow’s Telling: Words in Motion, and has been published in many periodicals and anthologies. Eli speaks, teaches, and facilitates all over the United States and Canada at conferences, community events, and colleges about disability, queer and trans identities, and social justice. Among other pursuits, he has walked across the United States for peace, coordinated a rape prevention program, and helped organize the first ever Queerness and Disability Conference.

The NARRATIVE ATELIER (June 5-8,2020)  will incorporate these Rounds and a workshop by Eli Clare.

This 4-day intensive Programme explores the theory, practice and teaching  of Narrative-Based Medicine through the close interpretation and reading  of:

  • Visual Narrative
  • Written and Reflective Narrative
  • Performed Narrative (Including Improv)
  • Cinematic Narrative
  • Journalistic Narrative
  • Modes of patient/client writing

 

For more on the Narrative Atelier-see this article from the latest issue of the WALRUS:

https://thewalrus.ca/how-literature-can-lead-to-better-healthcare/

 

To receive the finalized Atelier Program and to Register-please write to :

mspi.msh@sinaihealthsystem.ca

Allan D. Peterkin MD FCFP, FRCP
Professor of Psychiatry and Family Medicine,
Head, Health, Arts and Humanities Program and UGME/Post-MD Studies Humanities Lead,

Resident Writing Group – Next Meeting Nov 19

University of Toronto Residents’ Creative Writing Group

Are you interested in stretching your creative muscles? Looking to refine a creative work for publication? Or perhaps just to inject a dose of humanities into your medical practice?

The University of Toronto Residents’ Creative Writing Group is here to help!

We comprise of a group of residents and fellows at the University of Toronto interested in sharing and improving our writing. Meetings are held approximately once a month, 2 hours in length.

We welcome residents/fellows from any specialty, and with an interest in any genre of writing (narrative medicine pieces, poetry, fiction, memoir, creative non-fiction) as long as it’s written to be read.

Our next meeting is on Tuesday, November 19th at 7:30p.m. at the By the Way Café (400 Bloor St W).

If you wish to attend or would like more information, please join our facebook group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/1490804187882797/) or email me at jonah.himelfarb@mail.utoronto.ca.

Happy writing!

Jonah

Jonah Himelfarb
Internal Medicine Resident
University of Toronto
Jonah.Himelfarb@mail.utoronto.ca