REMINDER: Grand Rounds – June 7, 2019 – Dr. Brian Goldman

This session is jointly sponsored by the U Toronto Departments of:

Family and Community Medicine;

Psychiatry, Division of Psychotherapies, Health Humanities and Education Scholarship (PHES);

and the Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Psychiatry

 ALL ARE WELCOME!

The Power of Kindness: A Personal and Professional Search

 Brian Goldman, MD, MCFP(EM), FACEP

 Friday, June 7, 2019 10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.followed by a book signing of “The Power of Kindness”.

June7-2019-GrdRds-Brian_Goldman

Dr. Brian Goldman is a staff emergency physician at Sinai Health System in Toronto. Since 2007, he has hosted White Coat, Black Art, an award-winning show about the patient experience in the culture of modern medicine. He is author of three Canadian bestselling books. His latest book, The Power of Kindness: Why Empathy is Essential in Everyday Life, his personal and professional search for empathy inside his brain, his heart and around the world.

 Learning Objectives:

  • Define the key parts of empathy and distinguish them from sympathy
  • List personal and system factors that detract from empathy in health care
  • Develop ways to be more empathic on the job

Location: Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Ave., 18th Floor Auditorium

Grand Rounds – June 7, 2019 – Dr. Brian Goldman

This session is jointly sponsored by the U Toronto Departments of:

Family and Community Medicine;

Psychiatry, Division of Psychotherapies, Health Humanities and Education Scholarship (PHES);

and the Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Psychiatry

 ALL ARE WELCOME!

The Power of Kindness: A Personal and Professional Search

 Brian Goldman, MD, MCFP(EM), FACEP

 Friday, June 7, 2019 10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.followed by a book signing of “The Power of Kindness”.

June7-2019-GrdRds-Brian_Goldman

Dr. Brian Goldman is a staff emergency physician at Sinai Health System in Toronto. Since 2007, he has hosted White Coat, Black Art, an award-winning show about the patient experience in the culture of modern medicine. He is author of three Canadian bestselling books. His latest book, The Power of Kindness: Why Empathy is Essential in Everyday Life, his personal and professional search for empathy inside his brain, his heart and around the world.

 Learning Objectives:

  • Define the key parts of empathy and distinguish them from sympathy
  • List personal and system factors that detract from empathy in health care
  • Develop ways to be more empathic on the job

Location: Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Ave., 18th Floor Auditorium

BPER – Graphic Medicine as a Resource for HPE

Best Practice in Education Rounds (BPER): Graphic Medicine as a Resource for Health Professional Education

May 7, 2019 (12pm-1pm) 
*no registration required

Li Ka Shing Building, 209 Victoria Street, 2nd Floor
Allan Waters Family Auditorium (LKSKI Auditorium)

Speaker: Shelley Wall, MScBMC PhD

Assistant Professor, Biomedical Communications Program,
Institute of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto;
Biology Department, University of Toronto Mississauga
Chair, Accreditation Review Committee for the Medical Illustrator (ARC-MI)

Session Description:
The field of “graphic medicine”—that is, the intersection of comics and health care—encompasses the study of comics and graphic novels about health care and illness, the creation of comics as vehicles for learning and reflection among health care professionals, and the use of comics as an alternative means of communication about serious health and bioscience topics to patient populations and the lay public. This area of study has become firmly established in the past decade, with peer-reviewed publications in high-profile journals such as the BMJ, a dedicated book series out of Penn State Press, official recognition via a regular feature in Annals of Internal Medicine, comics incorporated into electives in some medical schools as a resource for professional identity formation, and an annual international conference.

This presentation will give a brief overview of the field, introduce some key publications, consider the growing evidence for the efficacy of visual narrative in health care education, and model one hands-on exercise for incorporating graphic medicine in an educational context.

Learning Objectives:
After participation in this session, learners will be able to:
–       Define the field of graphic medicine
–       Locate resources in the field of graphic medicine
–       Describe the language of comics using discipline-specific vocabulary
–       Identify opportunities to incorporate graphic medicine into health professional education

 

Sameena Ahmed │ Education Program Coordinator – Centre for Faculty Development
Li Ka Shing International Healthcare Education Centre at St. Michael’s Hospital
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto
T 416-864-6060 x76215 │ E ahmedsam@smh.ca | cfd.utoronto.ca

AGO Seminars – SEEING ART AS MEDICINE

Seeing Art as Medicine

Registration Info Below-Numbers Limited

This 3-part seminar guides Medical Students and Residents in a

  • * close observation of art,
  • * group reflection, and
  • * art-making

within the Art Gallery of Ontario’s collection, to let art tell us what we need to know about seeing, witnessing and engaging in the context of care.

The gallery allows objects and images to illuminate the doctor-patient relationship in ways the clinic can’t, giving us space to question and understand our roles with one another without the pressures to know, perform, or explain.

Goals

  • * Foster cognitive skills, such as description and interpretation (and better understand the distinction between the two), critical thinking, and metacognition
  • * Sharpen technical abilities such as close observation, diagnostic acumen, pattern recognition and the perception of non-verbal cues
  • * Deepen interpersonal skills with both patients and colleagues, such as collaboration, social awareness and cultural sensitivity
  • * Nurture humanistic qualities such as tolerance of ambiguity, creativity and self-reflection
  • * Understand the role of embodied witnessing in the practice of medicine.

Presenter

Eva-Marie Stern, RP, MA, Assistant Professor U of T Dept of Psychiatry, is an art therapist, psychotherapist and educator. She co-founded WRAP in 1998 and the Trauma Therapy Program at Women’s College Hospital. Her chapter, co-authored with Shelley Wall, “The Visible Curriculum” appears in Health Humanities in Postgraduate Medical Education (Peterkin & Skorzewska, Eds, Oxford University Press, 2018), expands on how looking at and making art vitalize learning in medicine. She offers various art-based medical education initiatives in hospitals, museums and community studios.

Time and place

Wednesdays April 17 & 24 & May 1, 2019 from 6:30pm-8:30pm

Art Gallery of Ontario

Enrolment:

Open to all Residents, Medical Students, and Learners from other disciplines on a first-come, first-served basis. There is no cost for participation, but enrolment is required, and ATTENDANCE IS EXPECTED at ALL THREE seminar/workshops. No art experience is necessary. Entrance to the gallery and art supplies provided.

For more information and to sign up, please contact: allan.peterkin@utoronto.ca

Poetry Panel at Mount Sinai – April 16

Why Are You So Scared? & Other Questions about Poetry, Medicine and Shocks of Mortality

A conversation with a poet-physician, a poet-patient, and the Mount Sinai Health System poet-in-residence.

With Shane Neilson, author of Dysphoria (PQL); Molly Peacock, author of The Analyst (Biblioasis); and Ronna Bloom, author of The More Pedlar Press).

Moderated by Dr. Allan Peterkin, Head, The Program In Health, Arts and Humanities, University of Toronto

WWW.HEALTH-HUMANITIES.COM

Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto. 600 University Ave.
Auditorium, 18th Floor,
Thursday, April 16, 2019, 6-9pm

Please see the Why Are You So Scared – Panel program 2019 – all are welcome !

Monthly Meditation for Mindful Living and Clinical Practice

Meditation for Mindful Living and Clinical Practice is a series of monthly open sessions offered by Bill Gayner through the Health, Arts and Humanities Program. The objective of the series is to provide mental health professionals and students from all clinical disciplines an opportunity to learn or further develop meditation skills for enhancing their self-care and therapeutic presence with clients.

Date:                    4th Tuesday of each month
Time:                    6:30-8:30pm
Cost:                     $35/session, $150/five sessions, $300/year. Free for the first five students/residents to register for each session
Location:              Room 939, the Large Group Room, Mount Sinai Hospital Joseph and Wolf Lebovic Health Complex
To get to the Large Group Room, take the main elevators to the 9th floor. As you are leaving the elevator area, turn left and then left again and walk down the long hallway in front of you. The door to the Large Group Room is the last door on your left. Or just follow the signs.

Registration:         RSVP required at bgayner@mtsinai.on.ca

Bill Gayner is a mental health clinician in Psychiatry, Mount Sinai Hospital. He teaches and researches mindfulness groups for people living with HIV, ambulatory patients in general psychiatry, and hospital staff. He also integrates mindfulness into individual psychotherapy his work in the Clinic for HIV-Related Concerns. He is the course director of the Mindful Psychotherapy program in the Mount Sinai Psychotherapy Institute; faculty with the Health, Arts and Humanities Program at U of T; and an Adjunct Lecturer at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto.

Bill Gayner, BSW, MSW, RSW
Mental Health Clinician
Adjunct Lecturer, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work University of Toronto Mount Sinai Hospital Joseph and Wolf Lebovic Health Complex
600 University Avenue, Room 965A
Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X5
t. 416-586-4800 x 8647
f. 416-586-5970

TEAM NARRATIVE

TEAM NARRATIVE IS A COLLECTIVE OF EDUCATORS ACROSS CLINICAL AND HUMANITIES DISCIPLINES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO WHO OFFER LECTURES AND WORKSHOPS ON THE ROLE OF WORKING WITH STORIES IN LEARNING AND HEALTH-RELATED ENCOUNTERS.

THE GOAL OF THIS TEACHING IS TO IMPROVE   : REFLECTIVE CAPACITY, NARRATIVE COMPETENCE, VISUAL LITERACY AND CRITICAL THINKING.

TEAM NARRATIVE is a collaboration between the Health, Arts and Humanities Program and the MSPI (Mount Sinai Psychotherapy Institute). Sessions are available for  learners from all disciplines and levels of training. We are also a part of PHES, The Division of Psychotherapies, Humanities and Educational Scholarship within the Department  of Psychiatry which focuses on Reflective Capacity and Relationship-Centered Care.

Faculty:

Allan Peterkin MD -TEAM NARRATIVE Leader
Mary Beattie PHD, Susan Belanger MLS, Monica Branigan MD; Ronna Bloom MEd/Poet-In-Residence;
Sue Macrae RN, PHD; Allison Crawford MD; Bill Gayner MSW;   Barry Gilbert MD,
Karen Gold PHD, RSW, Julie Hann OT, Debra Hamer MD, Afarin Hosseini MD, Hartley Jafine MA ,Rex Kay MD, Louise Kinross; Elysse Leonard M.A., Nancy McNaughton PHD; Carol Nash PHD , LJ Nelles MFA
Aaron Orkin MD, MPH , Nick Pimlott MD Michael Roberts MD,  Ron Ruskin MD;
Tilda Shalof RN; Miriam Shuchman MD, Anne Simmonds RN, PHD,   Eva-Marie Stern (Art Therapist); Paul Uy MD;
Shelley Wall PHD (Illustrator  In Residence), Dan Yashinsky (Storyteller in Residence)

Introductory Lectures
These can be scheduled as 45-minute talks with discussion time or 1.5 -3 hour workshops:

1)    A Humanities Toolkit Rounds (ie discussion of an image, poem, film clip)
2)    An Introduction To   Narrative-Based Medicine-close reading of a short story/poem and a reflective writing exercise

Seminar Packages of three or more sessions:
3)      Visual Narrative -working with images and non-verbal cues
4)         The Reflecting Poem-a writing workshop (Ronna)
5)      Ten Tips For Incorporating Narrative Competence Into A Busy Practice
6)          Narrative Medicine Workshop-Part Two-    Deepening The Discussion
7)      Therapeutic Writing-using narrative with patients
8)       Narrative As Advocacy/Disability Studies
9)       Narrative and Spirtuality
10)      Situation Critical-Narratives of the ER and ICU
11)      Narrative In Palliative Care
12)      Narrative and Ageing
13)         The Patient Speaks -given by a person living with stigma,  chronic physical or mental illness
14)      Stories Matter-Narrative-based Ethics-Looking At Difficult Stories
15)      Narrative and Mindful Presence
16)      Stories and The Body-A Theater-Based Workshop on Physical Presence
17)      Using film clips to teach about the doctor-patient relationship and patient    advocacy
18)      Using Narrative with Patient Self-Help Groups
19)       An introduction to Graphic Medicine
20)       Narrative and Medical Error
21)       When Stories Collide –Narrative, Personal Values  and Moral Distress
22)        Narratives From The News-Examining Media Representations of Medicine
23)       Approaches to  Oral History
24)       Narratives of Loss and Trauma
25)       Finding A Research Topic Through Personal Narrative
26)       Narrative and IPE/Team-Building

SUPERVISIONS/CONSULTATION/TRAINING:

Faculty Development In Close Reading of an Image and Text, Reflective Writing Techniques, Close Listening and Evaluation of Student Reflective Writing

Qualitative Research in Narrative Medicine

Supervision of an ongoing Reflective Writing Group for clinicians, teachers  or patient groups could be offered

Consultation on reflective portfolio course creation/implementation/evaluation  at     the undergrad/inter-professional/postgrad/CME level

Working With Difficult Stories-A Balint Group (6-8 sessions)

A Weekend Digital Storytelling Workshop For  Students or Patients

To arrange these sessions please contact   :  apeterkin@mtsinai.on.ca
_________________________________________________________________

MSPI Workshops in Therapeutic Writing With Patients/Narrative Competence Psychotherapy –this 2 Day Workshop is offered every 2 years-see
http://www.mountsinai.on.ca/care/psych/staff-education-programs/mspi/

MSPI CERTIFICATE IN NARRATIVE-BASED CARE

http://www.mountsinai.on.ca/care/psych/staff-education-programs/mspi/
Offered in conjunction with the MSPI (Mount Sinai Psychotherapy Institute) – accepted candidates can receive a Certificate after completing a specified number of hours in seminars, supervision and self-study (project completion)
See:  http://www.mountsinai.on.ca/care/psych/staff-education-programs/mspi/   for details

Theatre of Medicine/Staging Medicine

Instructors:
Suvendrini Lena MD,MPH FRCPC Staff Neurologist CAMH
Colleen Murphy, Playwright.

2015-16 Theatre of Medicine Seminar

How does the structure and craft of great theatre work to unsettle our ideas of disease and healing?

This seminar invites residents across medical specialties to enter into the subjective experience of illness through the medium of theatre. In the Incubator at Toronto’s newly renovated Theatre Center we will read scenes from Chekhov, Shakespeare and Ibsen as well as contemporary playwrights.  As actors/reader we will enter directly into the world of – psychosis, suicide, cancer, and dementia for example – in order to see and understand these states freshly and deeply. Fuelled by this understanding we will write our own scenes with a staged reading of new work as a possible finale to the seminar.

The seminar will include Ibsen’s Enemy of the People staged at Tarragon in October 2014 and Chekhov’s The Seagull at CanStage February 2015.

The Seminar is led by Suvendrini Lena, neurologist and playwright together with renowned playwright Colleen Murphy. Murphy is a recipient of a Governor General’s Award for her play The December Man. Seminar can be taken for elective credit. Please contact course director for further details.

Participation is limited to 12-16 residents/fellows please register early.  Deadline for registration is August 30 2014.

Elective credit available.  Details may vary according to program.  Please contact course director for further information on dates/registration/location: suvendrini.lena@camh.ca

Psychiatry and The Arts Seminars (for Psychiatry residents only)

Have you ever wondered how to use a short story in your work with a psychotherapy patient? Have you ever asked yourself what happens in an art therapy session? Have you ever thought acting classes might help with your being more present with your patients? If so this seminar on the link between the arts and psychiatry is for you. This seminar explores the relationship between the arts and psychiatry and includes hands-on experience in various art forms: reading literature, attending plays , discussing films and much more.

The learning objectives are:
TO PROVIDE
1)      A general overview of how the arts and medicine (and psychiatry in particular) are linked.
2)      An exploration of how the arts can inform your clinical practice.
3)      Demonstrations of how the arts can help you challenge personal biases and assumptions and increase your understanding of patients.
4)      Discussions on how the arts can improve your reflective capacity, critical thinking and personal wellbeing.

The seminar is open to ALL psychiatry residents and fellows although space is limited so enroll early for this series of seminars!

The seminar takes place approximately once every six weeks on a Wednesday evenings for 2 to 3 hours, in an informal setting.

The dates, locations and registration info for 2015-16 will be posted in September at www.health-humanities.com and at psychnews.

A series of topics will be suggested but suggestions from participants are always welcome!

For more information: contact    a.skorzewska@utoronto.ca

Creating Space VI Symposium

Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 21.17.25

Health Humanities: Social Accountability in action.
Montreal on April 15 and 16, 2016

We are pleased to invite submissions to participate in the Creating Space VI symposium in conjunction with the Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME).

The theme of the sixth meeting is ‘Health Humanities: Social Accountability in Action’.

Creating Space VI seeks to include the ever-growing number of scholars, educators, artists and practitioners from multiple disciplines whose work at the intersections of AHSS and clinical spheres inspires health professions education in Canada and abroad. Student participation from AHSS disciplines and health professions is encouraged.

Proposals are due before midnight EDT, November 30, 2015.

Please view the Author’s Directives, where you will find complete information about all acceptable submission formats.

For more general information about the conference, please consult the Creating Space VI Website.

We hope you will join us in Montreal.

Gilles Leclerc and Marc Zaffran
Co-chairs, Organizing Committee,
University of Montreal
creatingspace2016@gmail.com

Follow us on twitter: @creatingspace6

Associated with:
Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME)

Seminar Offerings for 2015-16

Elective Seminar on the Arts and Psychiatry

What can the study of art bring to your psychiatry residency? There are many ways of increasing your understanding of patients, tracing the evolution of diagnoses, thinking more deeply about moral or ethical issues, observing how your patients and you communicate both physically and verbally and using different tools in the clinic.  This seminar offers you the opportunity of exploring how art can deepen your understanding of many aspects of psychiatry. If you would like to learn in a non-didactic engaging way this elective seminar is for you.

The seminar is being offered in the winter term. It will consist of 4 sessions from January to June on Wednesday evenings from approximately 6 pm to 9 pm (unless attending a performance). The small group allows for interesting discussion and the setting is usually very informal – someone’s home or a café for example. This year we will be looking at children’s literature and childhood development, doing an improvisational session with trained actors, going to the theatre and reflecting on different media can be used for autobiographical narrative and using film to explore different psychiatric concepts. The seminar is free and is entirely elective but a commitment to attend 4 out of the 5 sessions is required. There is no prior training required or background in the arts required.

The seminar is led by Anna Skrozewska with the help of artists and arts educators (e.g. actors, art therapists, TIFF program coordinators, museum staff etc)

Jan 27th
Feb 24th
April 13th
May 25th

The course is limited to a maximum of 10 participants. First come first served.

Respond via email. Anna.skorzewska@uhn.ca

Resident Creative Writing Group

We are a group of residents and fellows at the University of Toronto interested in sharing and improving our writing. We currently hold monthly meetings, capped at 10 attendees. Each meeting is co-facilitated by an experienced physician-writer or medical writer, who helps guide the discussion with the benefit of his or her experience. We welcome housestaff from any discipline, and with an interest in any genre of writing (narrative medicine pieces, poetry, fiction, memoir, creative non-fiction) as long as it’s written to be read.

Attendees are selected on a first-come, first-served basis, with preference given to residents who can regularly attend or who have work to present. Scheduling and location are to be determined by group consensus.
Participating housestaff will:

  1. Learn how to critique writing and be critiqued in a supportive environment
    2. Become comfortable with standards of confidentiality when writing about patients and peers
    3. Receive constructive feedback on writing
    4. Learn about the publishing process
    5. Learn about combining writing with medical careers
    6. Receive exposure to experienced physician-writers who can comment on all of the above.

For more information, including information about upcoming meetings and speakers, please contact Raffi Rush (PGY2, internal medicine) at raffir@gmail.com

 

Theatre of Medicine/Staging Medicine

How does the structure and craft of great theatre work to unsettle our ideas of disease and healing?

This seminar invites residents across medical specialties to enter into the subjective experience of illness through the medium of theatre. In the Incubator at Toronto’s newly renovated Theatre Center we will read scenes from Chekhov, Shakespeare and Ibsen as well as contemporary playwrights.  As actors/reader we will enter directly into the world of – psychosis, suicide, cancer, and dementia for example – in order to see and understand these states freshly and deeply. Fuelled by this understanding we will write our own scenes with a staged reading of new work as a possible finale to the seminar.

The Seminar is led by Suvendrini Lena, neurologist and playwright together with renowned playwright Colleen Murphy. Murphy is a recipient of a Governor General’s Award for her play The December Man. Seminar can be taken for elective credit. Please contact course director for further details.

Participation is limited to 12-16 residents/fellows please register early.

Elective credit available.  Details may vary according to program.  Please contact course director for further information on dates/registration/location: suvendrini.lena@camh.ca

Telling Trauma Through Art

Seminar series led by Eva-Marie Stern, art psychotherapist, trauma therapist

The four-part seminar series offers a combination of discussion/case presentation/experiential reflection on psychological trauma and its treatment.  Participants will explore the ways images both illuminate states of mind related to trauma, and serve as a vehicle for its transformation.  The series is open to all psychiatry residents, medical students, and learners from other disciplines who enroll.  There is no cost for participation, and art-making experience/confidence is not necessary.

Time and place:

4 seminars per year – Wednesdays 6:00-7:30 (dates TBA)

Women’s College Hospital, 7th floor (room TBA)

To enroll, contact: eva-marie.stern@wchospital.ca

Rationale:

This seminar is designed to help participants understand trauma.  Trauma can be seen as the unspeakable which demands expression, and takes it in many non-verbal forms.  Secrets and silence are its common idiom.  In its treatment, psychodynamic therapy greatly benefits from fluency in the world of images.

Through:

  • a guided practice of looking at images made in and out of therapy,
  • participants’ own image-making, and
  • conversation about the consonance of visual marks and states of mind that create them,

learners can better grasp the languages of distress, the meanings of non-verbal expression, and explore ways of attending to what can’t yet be said.  The mind’s use of images in grasping, organising and resolving trauma is constant, creative and effective — whether or not these pictures are ever made tangible.  Images are the media of post-traumatic re-experiencing, avoidance, and intrusion.  How we understand and respond to them — whether in art, metaphors, body markings, dreams or flashbacks — significantly shapes treatment.

Topics to include:

  • Aesthetics and assessment
  • Symptom as art, art as symptom
  • Shapes of empathy
  • Dissociation in art and life
  • Creativity and our fear of it
  • Art and words: a false dichotomy
  • Art as attitude, not as modality
  • Knowing and not knowing what we see
  • Aesthetics of trauma: fragments, layers, gaps
  • Looking Together, a means of exploring images without needing to know