ARTICULATING THE BODY THROUGH POETRY May 10th 🗓

Open to UofT students, faculty and alumni

Event: Articulating the Body: Ekphrasis at the Maude Abbott Museum (Digital Experience) 

Date: May 10. 7 pm-9pm

Sponsors: Poetry Matters of McGill University; Maude Abbott Medical Museum; University of Toronto  Program In Health, Arts and Humanities

Description: In this virtual workshop open only to University of Toronto students, faculty, and alumni, workshop leader Dr. Shane Neilson will take you through several ekphrastic exercises that will be both individual and collaborative. The workshop is deliberately constructed to start slow, at the descriptive level, and it carefully builds in a layered fashion. The body becomes animated and then begins developing links to other bodies and structures. The goal is to refine creative writing techniques. The special aspect to this workshop is that the creative materials used for ekphrasis come from the important legacy of the legendary figure of Dr. Maude Abbott who, according to the Canadian Encyclopedia, “paved the way for women in medicine” and who, based on her work as a pathologist, “laid the foundation for modern heart surgery.” Dr. Rick Fraser, director of the Maude Abbott Medical Museum and an anatomic pathologist himself, will serve as the evening’s “living exhibit.”

Size Limit: 20, so sign up now!

Link for Sign Up: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/articulating-the-body-tickets-309927831487

Art is Patient SEMINARS AT THE AGO-May/June 2022 🗓

Art is Patient seminar series at the AGO

 FOR UofT  MEDICAL STUDENTS AND RESIDENTS

Both people and artwork are a challenge for us to meet. They can be opaque and complex and confusing. People and artworks might present themselves at first with their labels front-and-centre, but what do these really tell us?  As clinicians or as viewers, how do we approach and understand these layered beings as insightfully and respectfully as possible?

Art is Patient introduces learners to a series of steps to encounter art in a gallery as a means to explore how we might encounter people in our clinics and offices. The course recognizes that art and people don’t require specialized background knowledge in order to relate to them in meaningful ways. Rather, they need our mindful, open-minded engagement.

The seminar series turns a group of learners and the Art Gallery of Ontario into a dynamic lab for visual literacy. In each of three linked sessions, we engage with one or two pieces of artwork with openness, curiosity and humility. The art tells us what we need to know about seeing, witnessing and engaging in the context of care. The art gallery allows objects and images to clarify the clinician/patient relationship in ways the clinic can’t, giving us space to question and understand our roles with one another without the usual pressures to know or perform or explain.

Activities:

  • guided close observation of art
  • group reflection and
  • art-making

Goals:

  • Foster cognitive skills such as description and interpretation (and better understand the distinction between the two), critical thinking and metacognition
  • Sharpen technical abilities such as close observation, diagnostic acumen, pattern recognition and the perception of non-verbal cues
  • Deepen interpersonal skills with both patients and colleagues, such as collaboration, social awareness and cultural sensitivity
  • Nurture humanistic qualities such as tolerance of ambiguity, creativity and self-reflection
  • Understand the role of embodied witnessing in the practice of medicine.

Seminar leader:

Eva-Marie Stern, RP, MA, Adjunct Professor U of T Dept of Psychiatry, is an art therapist, psychotherapist and educator. She co-founded WRAP (within the Trauma Therapy Program) at Women’s College Hospital in 1998. Her chapter, co-authored with Shelley Wall, “The Visible Curriculum”, which appears in Health Humanities in Postgraduate Medical Education (Oxford U Press, 2018) expands on how looking at and making art can vitalize learning in medicine. She offers art-based medical education initiatives in hospitals, museums and community studios.

Time/place:

3 sessions in sequence:

3:00 to 4:30 on Wednesdays May 25, June 1, and June 8, 2022

In person: Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas St West

Enrolment:

Open to all U of T Medical Students and Residents on a first-come, first-served basis.
There is no cost for participation but enrolment is limited for a small group experience.

ATTENDANCE IS EXPECTED AT ALL THREE seminar/workshops.
No art experience is necessary.

Tickets are graciously provided by the AGO.

For more information and to register, please contact: emstern@artandmind.net

April 6, 2022 – Mentoring and Editing in Poetry 🗓

POETRY MONTH EVENT

Event title:

Mentoring and Editing in Poetry: An Hour of Reading and Conversation between Tolu Oloruntoba and Jim Johnstone

Scheduled event date: 4/6/2022

Poets: Tolu Oloruntoba and Jim Johnstone

Host: Shane Neilson, Team Narrative member of  the Health Arts and Humanities Program at the University of Toronto

Eventbrite Link:  https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/mentoring-and-editing-in-poetry-an-hour-of-reading-and-conversation-tickets-292217178447

Description: Tolu Oloruntoba’s The Junta of Happenstance was awarded the current Governor-General’s Award Winner for Poetry. Jim Johnstone, a noted poet himself, whose Infinity Mirror was just released from Vehicule Press, served as mentor and editor for Oloruntoba at Palimpsest Press. Both poets have experienced periods of illness in their lives. This evening will feature readings from Oloruntoba (who is also a medical doctor) and Johnstone, as well as a conversation held between each other about editorial process and illness. The kind of intimate conversational space created is uncommon in Canadian literature. Time will be preserved for audience questions for two of the most exciting poets currently writing in Canada. 

Sponsors: League of Canadian Poets, Canada Council, Ontario Arts Council, Health Arts and Humanities Program at the University of Toronto, and the Ontario D/deaf/HoH, Disabled, Mad and Neuroatypical Poetics Festival.

 

 

 

Be Good to Yourself, Whoever You Are 🗓

As part of The Winter Solstice Series
curated by Hard Feelings, I will be offering the workshop

Be Good to Yourself, Whoever You Are

Date and time

Tue, March 1, 2022, 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM EST

Often in work, and in life, energy moves towards projects and people but there’s little left for your own restoration. In this workshop, through the use of poems and prompts, you will be nudged into writing and reflecting on what sustains you, what you love and what you need. Take this time for yourself as a flicker of possibility of how you might take time for yourself in general.

This session is part of the Winter Solace FREE online series. For individuals who are feeling isolated, struggling to find supports, and interested in developing new ways of coping.

CRITERIA FOR PARTICIPATION:

• Self-identify as financially vulnerable

• In need of mental health and/or well being supports

• Live in the GTA

• Ages 18+

Register Here.

For info on other sessions in the series, contact Kate Scowen

Two Poetry Workshops and a poem

Hello, welcome,

I have two workshops to share with you. And a poem.
These offerings come with my best wishes
for your health and strength.

Ronna

***

Postcards from the Edge:
Addressing Compassion/Covid Fatigue in Note Form

A workshop for medical students, physicians, residents, and other health practitioners.

Perhaps you are too overwhelmed to read this. Let’s be brief: this workshop will address the impacts on you –physical, emotional, professional — of living through Covid, while caring for human suffering. In notes. A creative writing workshop. With other hesitant people. Using poems as guides. Have a rest; write something. No experience necessary.

Sponsored by The Temerty Faculty of Medicine at University of Toronto.
February 15, 5:30PM-7PM
Register here

***

As part of The Winter Solstice Series
curated by Hard Feelings, I will be offering the workshop

Be Good to Yourself, Whoever You Are

Often in work, and in life, energy moves towards projects and people but there’s little left for your own restoration. In this workshop, through the use of poems and prompts, you will be nudged into writing and reflecting on what sustains you, what you love and what you need. Take this time for yourself as a flicker of possibility of how you might take time for yourself in general.

This session is part of the Winter Solace FREE online series. For individuals who are feeling isolated, struggling to find supports, and interested in developing new ways of coping.

CRITERIA FOR PARTICIPATION:

• Self-identify as financially vulnerable

• In need of mental health and/or well being supports

• Live in the GTA

• Ages 18+

Register Here.

For info on other sessions in the series, contact Kate Scowen

***

Lastly, here’s a new poem.
“An Excruciating Blue Day” was published in The Malahat Review

***
Thanks for taking the time.
ronna

Postcards from the Edge: Addressing Compassion/Covid Fatigue in Note Form 🗓

A workshop for Medical Students, Residents and Health Care Professionals

Postcards from the Edge: Addressing Compassion/Covid Fatigue in Note Form

Perhaps you are too overwhelmed to read this. Let’s be brief: this workshop will address the impacts on you — physical, emotional, professional — of living through Covid while caring for human suffering. In notes. A creative writing workshop. With other hesitant people. Using poems as guides. Have a rest; write something. No experience necessary.

Goals
— Learn five rules for writing that can be used to reflect on one’s work, relationships, and life
— Engage with poetry as a tool for understanding and expressing challenges
— Increase awareness of the impact of the professional on the personal, and the personal on the professional
— Explore poetry and writing as practices of self-care

Time and place: 
Tuesday February 15, 5:30PM-7PM,  You will receive a zoom link when you register. 

Workshop leader: 
Ronna Bloom is a poet and teacher. Her most recent book, The More, was long listed for the City of Toronto Book Award. Her poems have been recorded by the CNIB and translated into Spanish, Bangla, and Chinese. She has collaborated with health care professionals, filmmakers, academics, students, spiritual leaders, and architects. A frequent guest in the faculties of Nursing, Medicine, Public Health, as well at teaching hospitals, she brings 25 years of psychotherapy practice to her work as a poet and facilitator.

Ronna developed the first Poet in Residence program at Sinai Health which ran from 2012-2019. She is currently Poet in Community to the University of Toronto and Poet in Residence in the Health, Arts and Humanities Programme. Her “Spontaneous Poetry Booth” and “RX for Poetry” have been featured in hospitals and fundraisers in Canada and abroad. Her chapbook, Who is your mercy contact? will be published in March.

Ronna Bloom, M.ED
Poet in Residence, HAH, University of Toronto
Poet in Community, University of Toronto
www.ronnabloom.com 

To register: Open to all U of T Medical Students, Residents, Physicians and Learners from other disciplines. Register here.

Health Humanities event: the poetry of psychosis 🗓

Join the League of Canadian Poets and the Canadian Association for Health Humanities for the latest session in the Cross Pollinations Virtual Rounds Series!

When: Wednesday, October 27, 6pmEST/3pmPST

Topic: The Poetics of Psychosis

Speakers: Bahar Orang (physician and poet) and Khashayar Mohammadi (poet)

Registration: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIqde2vqj0sEtYaQfM3sScnBJbE8rl2F0_A

The Poetics of Psychosis: Join us with poet Khashayar Mohammadi, drawing on his experiences with psychosis, and poet-physician Bahar Orang, drawing on her psychiatry training, for an integrated discussion on poetry and medicine as they relate to medical cultures and discourses of psychosis.

Bahar Orang is a writer and physician-in-training living in Toronto. Where Things Touch: A Meditation on Beauty is her first book.

Khashayar Mohammadi is a queer, Iranian born, Toronto-based Poet, Writer and Translator. He is the author of four poetry Chapbooks. His debut poetry collection Me, You, Then Snow is out with Gordon Hill Press.

The Canadian Association for Health Humanities and the League of Canadian Poets are partnering to deliver a series of monthly rounds focused on health, arts and humanities. These live sessions will feature both artists and professionals in the Health Humanities field for a multi-faceted conversation about topics related to healthcare, art, healing, and humanities.

This series is ideal for people in arts communities, poets and writers, as well as those working in healthcare.

This one-credit-per-hour Group Learning program has been certified by the College of Family Physicians of Canada for up to 12  Mainpro+® credits.

Scars, X-Rays, Tattoos, and Other Stories of The Body 🗓

A Workshop for Medical Students, Residents and Health Professionals 

When you look at a body, you see a history. 

Once the body isn’t seen anymore, 

the story it tried to tell gets lost.   

Louise Gluck

This workshop explores how our bodies tell stories and how we respond to them in ourselves and with each other. Using poems as prompts, we’ll write, aiming to explore and express some of what our bodies are saying, getting to hear and voice these implicit, ongoing conversations. In reflecting on our own embodied expressions, we’ll begin to reflect on the stories patients might be telling or not with theirs. The event is synced to Halloween, a public reminder of how we inhabit our bodies, consciously and unconsciously, by choice or by chance.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To get curious about the stories a body is telling
  2. To use poetry as a way to reflect on and deepen your health care practice
  3. To process experiences as a practitioner or student in health care
  4. To learn five rules for writing which can offer a method of self-care and reflection

Time and place:

Thursday October 28, 2021
5:30PM-7PM
On Zoom.

Register here.

Ronna Bloom is a poet and teacher. Her most recent book, The More, was published by Pedlar Press in 2017 and long listed for the City of Toronto Book Award. Her poems have been recorded by the CNIB and translated into Spanish, Bangla, and Chinese. She has collaborated with health care professionals, filmmakers, academics, students, spiritual leaders, and architects. A frequent guest in the faculties of Nursing, Medicine, Public Health, as well at teaching hospitals, she brings 25 years of psychotherapy practice to her work as a poet and facilitator.

Ronna developed the first Poet in Residence program at Sinai Health which ran from 2012-2019. She is currently Poet in Community to the University of Toronto and Poet in Residence in the Health, Arts and Humanities Programme. Her “Spontaneous Poetry Booth” and “RX for Poetry” have been featured in hospitals and fundraisers in Canada and abroad. A chapbook of Ronna’s new poems, Who is your mercy contact? will be published by Espresso-Chapbooks in January 2022.

Ronna Bloom, M.ED
Poet in Residence, HAH, University of Toronto
Poet in Community, University of Toronto
www.ronnabloom.com

Poetry Month/University of Toronto Health Humanities Event – April 20 🗓

Topic: How Poems Move in the Hospital

Time: Apr 20, 2021 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Download flyer: Zoom invite #2
 
Adam Sol has published one collection of essays, How a Poem Moves: A Field Guide for Readers of Poetry and four books of poetry, with a fifth on the way from ECW Press in the Fall of 2022. He is the Coordinator of the Creative Expression & Society Program at the University of Toronto’s Victoria College.

 

 

Dominik Parisien’s debut poetry collection Side Effects May Include Strangers was published by McGill-Queen’s University Press in fall 2020 and his work has recently appeared in Maisonneuve, PRISM International, The Literary Review of Canada, This Magazine, the Canadian Medical Association Journal, and elsewhere. He also co-edited several anthologies, including the Hugo Award-winning Disabled People Destroy Science Fiction. Dominik is a disabled, bisexual French Canadian. He lives in Toronto.

With deep artistic roots in dance, it is poetry that has wed Moira MacDougall’s love of movement and rhythm with voice and linguistic performance.  A 10 year family sojourn through the ‘Land of Malady/County of Cancer’ informs her second collection of poems, Vanishing Acts (Pedlar Press, 2019).  Published in Canadian and US literary journals, she is the Poetry Editor for the Literary Review of Canada.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Event curated by: SHANE NEILSON MD
 MFA MA PhD CCFP FCFP
Poet, physician, critic
Assistant Clinical Professor (Adjunct), McMaster University
and member of TEAM NARRATIVE (University of Toronto)
Sponsored by WWW.HEALTH-HUMANITIES.COM (University of Toronto)